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Posts tagged with "Book"

  • Atomic Adventures: Secret Islands, Forgotten N-Rays, and Isotopic Murder—A Journey into the Wild World of Nuclear Science
    James Mahaffey

    Book

    Atomic Adventures

    Atomic Adventures, James Mahaffey’s latest contribution to the history of nuclear science, reads like a collection of spooky tales perfect for sharing around the campfire this summer. Have you heard the one about the Nazi engineer who built a nuclear reactor in Argentina? Or how a crazed father tried to poison his son with radiation?… Read More
  • The Secret Life of the Mind: How Your Brain Thinks, Feels, and Decides
    Mariano Sigman

    Book ,

    The Secret Life of the Mind

    The human brain is one of the most complex organs known to modern science, and many things are yet to be understood about how it shapes our identity—or how our identity can shape it. In his first book, The Secret Life of the Mind, Argentinian neuroscientist Mariano Sigman positions readers to explore the fundamentals of… Read More
  • The Evolution of Beauty: How Darwin’s Forgotten Theory of Mate Choice Shapes the Animal World—and Us
    Richard O. Prum

    Book ,

    An ornithologist argues for the evolution of beauty for beauty’s sake

    Imagine a world created by the quest for beauty, filled with colorful dancing and governed by the principle of autonomous sexual freedom. To access this world, according to Richard Prum, you need only take a stroll outside and watch the avian rites of spring. The Evolution of Beauty represents the culmination of decades of Prum’s… Read More
  • The Book of Circles: Visualizing Spheres of Knowledge
    Manuel Lima

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    A richly illustrated compendium probes the colorful history of the circle

    One of the most arresting images in Manuel Lima’s new study of visual culture, The Book of Circles, is also one of the simplest: a red and green serpent, looped on a bed of black script, swallowing its own tail. This is no drawn-from-life depiction of animal behavior but a figure in an alchemical manuscript… Read More
  • Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming
    Paul Hawken, Ed.

    Book ,

    An ambitious plan to leverage existing solutions to global warming is short on analytic rigor

    In Drawdown, entrepreneur Paul Hawken and colleagues introduce an ambitious project to build a social movement around a science-based plan to reduce the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The new volume is a handsome collection of short essays identifying what Hawken and his collaborators believe to be the 80 most effective actions that… Read More
  • Darwin’s Unfinished Symphony: How Culture Made the Human Mind
    Kevin N. Laland

    Book , ,

    What began as a small increase in the fidelity of social learning may have made all the difference in human evolution

    Despite ardently defending his theory of natural selection, Alfred Russel Wallace felt that evolution alone could not account for our species’ unique features, including our big brains, mental abilities and moral sentiments. To explain humanity, he challenged, demands, “some power, distinct from that which has guided the development of the lower animals” (1). In the… Read More
  • Evolution’s Bite: A Story of Teeth, Diet, and Human Origins
    Peter S. Ungar

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    A paleoecological exploration probes the evolution of human diets

    Most popular books on human evolution leverage the discovery of a new fossil to reassess how paleoanthropologists have pieced together our evolutionary history. In Evolution’s Bite, Peter Ungar takes a very different approach, focusing on the structure and function of teeth to chart the dietary adaptations of living primates and fossil and archaeological hominin populations. Read More
  • Burn Out: The Endgame for Fossil Fuels
    Dieter Helm

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    Mapping emerging trends in energy innovation, an economist anticipates a fossil fuel–free future

    Projecting how we produce and use energy a generation or more into the future is a task fraught with challenges, but Dieter Helm’s Burn Out does just that while avoiding the usual pitfalls. This new book identifies three “predictable surprises” that will affect our energy future and traces their economic effects. Along the way, Helm… Read More
  • The Enigma of Reason
    Hugo Mercier and Dan Sperber

    Book

    Placing reasoning research in evolutionary context, a new book probes the haphazard ways we form opinions

    Readers of Science are unlikely to be surprised that decision-makers often disregard the best, most empirically informed conclusions. A string of recent editorials and articles have highlighted the devastating consequences and unique challenges of entering what some have called a “postfactual era.” Turning evidence into policy demands an artful negotiation of often competing social, political… Read More
  • Biosecurity Dilemmas: Dreaded Diseases, Ethical Responses, and the Health of Nations
    Christian Enemark

    Book ,

    Outmoded policies may be undermining our ability to safeguard against infectious diseases

    Before the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) was signed in 1972, many terrible diseases—including tularemia, glanders, Q fever, and staphylococcal enterotoxins—were legally weaponized by national governments, including the United States, the United Kingdom, and Germany. Now, in 2017, the technical ability to make and create new bioweapons is exponentially greater. Biological techniques and e… Read More
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