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  • The Travel Diaries of Albert Einstein: The Far East, Palestine, and Spain, 1922–1923
    Ze’ev Rosenkranz, Ed.

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    Private travel diaries reveal Albert Einstein’s musings and moments of self-reflection

    From 1922 to 1923, Albert Einstein maintained a private travel diary, which is alive with his important and trivial adventures. Notably, however, he failed to record the news that he had been awarded the Nobel Prize. This omission suggests both confidence in his scientific ideas and a lack of personal vanity but also suggests alienation… Read More
  • Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup
    John Carreyrou

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    A biotech company’s blood test proves too good to be true

    In the opening pages of Bad Blood, the chief financial officer for the blood-testing company Theranos meets with his boss, Elizabeth Holmes, a charismatic 20-something Stanford University dropout, and warns her that the company must stop lying to its investors. Holmes’s expression turns icy. She informs him that he’s not a team player. Then she… Read More
  • The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs: A New History of a Lost World
    Steve Brusatte

    Book

    Results roll in from the dinosaur renaissance

    Paleontological research has accelerated in exciting ways over the past two decades, as kids who grew up on Jurassic Park and the dinomania of the 1980s and 1990s have joined the ranks of legendary paleontologists leading the “dinosaur renaissance.” Steve Brusatte’s The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs takes readers on a tour of the… Read More
  • How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence
    Michael Pollan

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    A revival in the scientific study of psychedelics prompts a journalist to take a trip

    Known for his writing on plants and food, Michael Pollan, in his latest book, How to Change Your Mind, brings all the curiosity and skepticism for which he is well known to a decidedly different topic: the psychedelic drugs d-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and psilocybin. In addition to being a balanced piece of journalistic science… Read More
  • The Feather Thief: Beauty, Obsession, and the Natural History Heist of the Century
    Kirk Wallace Johnson

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    A fly-tying flutist’s bizarre theft highlights the importance of natural history collections

    On 23 June 2009, after closing time, Edwin Rist broke a pane of glass at the back of the Natural History Museum at Tring, in Hertfordshire, U.K., and lowered himself into the quiet, darkened building. Within a few hours, he had hauled armfuls of bird skins—some of which had been collected more than a century… Read More
  • The Order of Time
    Carlo Rovelli

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    A quantum physicist reveals why time is not as simple as it seems

    Carlo Rovelli, best-selling author of Seven Brief Lessons on Physics, is back with a new book, The Order of Time. This latest venture offers insight into the notion of time, including narratives on how our understanding of the concept has changed from antiquity to the present, as well as a concise update on how time… Read More
  • The Truth About Animals: Stoned Sloths, Lovelorn Hippos, and Other Tales from the Wild Side of Wildlife
    Lucy Cooke

    Book

    PODCAST: Q&A with Lucy Cooke, author of The Truth About Animals

    The medieval belief that beavers will chew off their own testicles to escape a hunter may seem laughable now, but many other mischaracterizations of animals—the “lazy” sloth, the hyena as simpering scavenger—remain commonplace. This week on the Science podcast, Lucy Cooke discusses some of the strangest of these misconceptions. To hear the rest of the… Read More
  • Superbugs: An Arms Race Against Bacteria
    William Hall, Anthony McDonnell, and Jim O’Neill

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    In the fight against antimicrobial resistance, confronting economic challenges is key

    Ever since the advent of antibiotics, scientists and clinicians have warned of the potential for widespread antibiotic resistance. Indeed, the first in vitro study of resistance to penicillin was published in 1940, 2 years before the first patient was even treated with the drug. In the ensuing decades, experts and the media continued to warn… Read More
  • Army of None: Autonomous Weapons and the Future of War
    Paul Scharre

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    A sober treatise on the future of warfare warns of the perils of autonomous robotic combatants

    Sooner than you may think, robotic swarms will intercept incoming missiles at hypersonic speed, while dueling cyberattacks and countermeasures transpire at nearly the speed of light. Such strikes and counterstrikes will quickly overwhelm the capacities of human combatants to respond. Fiscal constraints and decreasing human resources, together with the promise of enhanced precision, effective risk… Read More
  • Who We Are and How We Got Here: Ancient DNA and the New Science of the Human Past
    David Reich

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    Troubling traces of biocolonialism undermine an otherwise eloquent synthesis of ancient genome research

    In Who We Are and How We Got Here, David Reich gracefully describes how recent advances in genomics have enabled the study of ancient genomes and how this, in turn, has significantly affected the study of the evolutionary and demographic history of our species. With a pleasant narrative style that immediately engages both scientists and… Read More
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