Skip to Content
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    Alzheimer’s and Infectious Disease: For Real

    I’ve written a couple of times over the years about the idea that Alzheimer’s disease might have an infectious component to it. That’s been proposed many times, but it’s fair to say that it’s never caught on. For one thing, the amyloid hypothesis has always had a lot more going for it. I realize that… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Welcome to Right to Try

    That didn’t take long. That didn’t take long at all. The federal “Right to Try” bill was just signed the other week, and we already have a company that’s willing – no, eager – to try it out. I will now cruelly caricature some of the the bill’s advocates for a moment. They’re imagining cures… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Looking Way Down Into the Cells

    Pharmacokinetics – the study of how drugs are taken up, distributed, metabolized, and cleared – is obviously a key part of drug development. Every drug substance gets handled somewhat differently by the human body, and these differences can completely determine whether you’ve got an effective therapy or not. But the tools we have… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Gene Therapy for Duchenne

    I have said unkind things about Sarepta’s drug for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, Exondys (eteplirsen). That’s because I did not think that there was enough information to approve it at the FDA, and I had trouble believing that its biochemical effects were enough to be meaningful in general. I have no reason to modify those opinions… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    That Other Kind of Job

    This tweet by ChemJobber caught my eye over the weekend. He’s referencing an article in the New Yorker on “The Bullshit-Job Boom”, which is a review of this new book by David Graeber at the London School of Economics. Graeber’s thesis is that there is a higher and higher fraction of the labor market occupied… Read More
  • Chemical News

    A Catalytic Dess-Martin?

    I have not tried this new reaction out, but it could be a real convenience, in several ways, for synthetic organic chemists. The authors, from Texas A&M, had previously reported an air-driven catalytic route to iodine (III) oxidants, and now they extend that work all the way up to iodine (V). The key is generation… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Finger-Pointing at Celgene

    Just what is going on at Celgene? They’ve had some odd recent setbacks (such as as the failure of Mongersen), and another such acquisition, Ozanimod, had its filing recently rejected by the FDA. Several things about that incident were eyebrow-raisers – for one, it’s rare for a large, established company to get an outright refusal- Read More
  • Chemical News

    Relay Calculates Its Way Through

    Bloomberg has a feature on Relay Therapeutics, who are just a few blocks away from me (and where several former colleagues of mine work). It’s a nice writeup, and also features a (relatively rare) spotlight on David Shaw of D. E. Shaw research. He’s one of those guys that you’ve likely never heard of unless… Read More
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    An Alzheimer’s Statement

    “Despite this latest setback, Eli Lilly remains committed to plunging through this concrete wall headfirst. This is a sad day for our WallBreaker 2020 program, and some of our longtime head bashers will recall similar periods during SkullButt 2012 and ConcreteCracker 2016. But we continue to believe that the only way past this wall is… Read More
  • General Scientific News

    Science Reform in China

    There have been all sorts of scientific scandals involving faked journal articles, faked peer reviews, duplicated papers and figures, etc. over the last few years. It’s been a running battle: our current technologies allow for these things to be done more easily, but caught more easily as well. And a pretty significant share of these… Read More
123...