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Be Sure The Funds Are Deposited

I’ve written before here about the many people who are convinced that most (or all) diseases have to do with the body’s pH – most often, you hear that your body has to be alkaline, and that cancer and other diseases are associated with acidity. To save time, I will stipulate that this is bullshit. The pH of blood is 7.4, and there are numerous systems that try to keep it there, along with a great deal of evidence about the trouble that awaits if that number goes too far in either direction. Various compartments of the body (and indeed, of individual cells) are similarly kept at different pH levels. Being able to have different hydrogen ion concentrations (pH values) on different sides of a membrane seems to be a fundamental requirement for life as we know it.

So anyone who goes around saying that you have to make your body alkaline is (at the very least) oversimplifying a great deal. But that’s being too charitable. The people who say such things also tend to say a lot of other stuff that’s even more demonstrably false – such as lemons being alkaline – and demonstrate, with relentless vigor, that they know nothing about pH, about biochemistry, and about medicine. I have yet to come across an “Adjust your body pH!” advocate who seemed to grasp any actual details about any of these subjects. I’ll revise my views if I ever encounter one, but so far, I have a good deal of evidence for the propositions that the viewpoint itself is bullshit (as stated above) and that furthermore, the people advocating it are ignorant at best and. . .well, let’s take a look at them at their worst.

That would be this story. I should warn you that it’s not easy reading. It’s about Naima Houder-Mohammed, a British army officer who found herself with a diagnosis of untreatable breast cancer. Desperate – as who wouldn’t be – she turned to a someone named Robert O. Young, who is a big booster of the alkaline-pH idea and who runs a “clinic” near San Diego.In case you feel remotely like giving time to his views, Young also believes that viruses, bacteria, and fungi are all the same organism, just at different pH levels. He says that almonds are “high in oxygen”, and he says that lipids in the human body are there to “bind the acidity”. Young – no, not “Dr.” Young, since his “degrees” are from diploma mills -says a great deal of stuff. He has been in operation for many years, but has recently been having some legal troubles, which to me appear to be richly deserved.

I have the word “clinic” in quotes because, on the basis of what I’ve read, said facility is devoted more to extracting cash from dying people, while giving them injections of sodium bicarbonate. No, that’s what he does. That BBC link reproduces some of the emails he exchanged with the late Cpt. Houder-Mohammed, in which he assures her that he can help her, and wants assurances from her in turn that funds have been deposited before she arrives in San Diego. Family and friends contributed ($77,000) to sending her – yes, she flew halfway around the world in order for a quack to inject her with baking soda, which is just sad and infuriating. She lasted three months before flying back to the UK to die.

In the article, Young is picturing smiling, and told the BBC that he feels no remorse, because of all the people he has helped. That’s his opinion; here’s mine: It is my fervent hope that he is convicted of the crimes of which he has been accused, and that he is put away before he can commit any more. Looking at him, looking at someone who spends his time giving useless treatments to desperate cancer patients and taking their money while they die in front of him, tells me (once again) that I don’t really understand what human beings are capable of.

One last point. I know that there’s a lot of talk these days about loosening up the drug approval process and clinical trials in general. (I haven’t covered this in detail so far, because I honestly cannot and will not chase every shiny object the new administration throws around – I’ll wait until something actually happens). But to the people advocating some of these ideas, I would ask you to consider that man may indeed be a wolf to man (homo homini lupus), and that any such changes take that into account. You may well want to unleash beneficial innovation, but be careful that you don’t enable a thousand more Robert Youngs.

65 comments on “Be Sure The Funds Are Deposited”

  1. Peter Kenny says:

    The ‘Calling Bullshit’ (I have no connection with this site) link that I’ve posted as the URL for this comment may be of interest.

    1. Some idiot says:

      The “yet another disclaimer” is a classic, but it would be a shame to exclude children under 12 years…

      😉

      Thanks for the link!!!

      1. Peter Kenny says:

        The following had me weeping with mirth:

        “The majority of administrative activity, whether in private business or the public sphere, often seems to be little more than a sophisticated exercise in the combinatorial reassembly of bullshit.”

  2. SP says:

    Entertainingly, the Food Babe story your other post linked to about lemons being alkaline has an editor’s note addressing that obviously falst claim, with a link to a youtube video that is… educational, but not in the sense of scientific facts. It’s a guy spewing nonsense about metabolism and sounds a great deal like a student who failed to study for a science test trying to make up answers that sound plausible to someone who knows no science. See, it’s metabolism, and it’s bad if there are sugars, but it’s the ash if you were to burn it, and that’s alkaline, see!

  3. NHR_GUY says:

    “Naima Houder-Mohammed”

    1. Pennpenn says:

      Any particular reason you just quoted the victim’s name?

      1. SedatedFMS says:

        Scary moooooslamic with ray guns or something.

      2. Derek Lowe says:

        I had typo-ed it in the first version posted, actually

  4. chemystry says:

    There was an excellent documentary on the BBC last night covering this and various other similar bits of anti-science – http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08bhd29

  5. Anon says:

    “And demonstrate, with relentless vigor, that they know nothing.”

    I would say they do know something, but as a Mark Twain once said:

    “It’s not what you know that gets you into trouble, it’s what you know for sure that ain’t so.”

  6. He2s22p2 says:

    One of my hockey teammates swears by ‘soda doping’ (for some absolute garbage related to Derek’s article, see this: https://groovybeets.com/soda-doping-fight-disease-cancer/). When he was discussing this I asked him how he expected the body’s pH to be regulated by essentially taking a tums, you know, with all the stomach acid and all. He proceeded to tell me that since it’s an antacid that’s how it works. I told him that he was unlikely to have heartburn, and then just stopped bothering with the explanation.

    1. Dr. Manhatten says:

      The first thing that came to my mind when you mentioned “soda doping” was Coke or Pepsi.
      I guess maybe Dr. Pepper would be more appropriate. Anyhow thanks for posting the link; always amazing how much BS (sorry, I meant “alternative facts”) there is out there…

  7. Anon says:

    “you hear that your body has to be alkaline, and that cancer and other diseases are associated with acidity. To save time, I will stipulate that this is bullshit.”

    At least your comments are acidic. 😄

    1. Falanx says:

      Salty, surely?

  8. Anon2 says:

    Mr. Young can’t be convicted soon enough, in my opinion.

    It would be wonderful if the court stipulated that, in the event he come down with any life-threatening malady in the future, he can only be treated with bicarb injections.

    1. Anon31415926 says:

      Sadly such a treatment would be considered cruel and unusual.
      If the court were going for real irony they would have him treated with a base much stronger and more powerful if he came down with a life threatening malady, because clearly for something life threatening you need to use the powerful bases to make the body less acidic ASAP. I would recommend… t-butyl lithium.
      I think people who push crap like this in general, let alone the real scum who take advantage of the dying or the grief of their loved ones, are a disease.

  9. Anon says:

    I hope he gets buried alive in soda lime.

  10. tlp says:

    The other day I had trouble finding a normal water bottle in a grocery store among dozens of pH 9, pH 10.5, ‘low sodium’ and other such crap for 5x price.

    1. oldnuke says:

      Or a KOH bath,,,

    2. Nick K says:

      Blimey, some people actually drink water at pH 9-10? It must taste horrible.

      1. zero says:

        Everyone knows medicine tastes terrible.

      2. biziclop says:

        I tried it when I had bad acid reflux. It’s not too bad. Unsurprisingly it tastes much like a spoonful of bicarbonate of soda dissolved in a cup of water.

  11. MTK says:

    There’s a lot of layers to this onion.

    a) there should be a special place in hell for people who knowingly peddle useless, or worse harmful, non-remedies to desperate sick people.
    b) there is a significant percentage of our population that believes the pharmaceutical industry, and we as willing participants in that industry, also fit the description in (a)
    c) the growth of people described in (a) and (b) is direct result of the breakdown in trust in all of our institutions, business, government, media, science, etc. People no longer believe or trust any of them. Instead they turn to shysters, malcontents, and dumbasses as long as they preach how these untrustworthy institutions are hiding the “truth” from us.

    1. Isidore says:

      I am not convinced from my own experience and I have seen no data to suggest that there are more people now who seek “alternative” health care options than, say, 10 or 20 or 50 years ago. Not to be callous, but there have always been desperate, gullible or just plain stupid people out there and, conversely, unscrupulous shysters and malcontents willing to take advantage of the former. With respect to desperate in particular, when all hope is lost one tends to grasp at whatever straws one sees. Over a decade ago my son had a brain tumor removed and in the process my wife, not a scientist but an educated and very intelligent person, became involved in moderating an on line support group for parents of children with brain tumors. She gave up after a couple of years, sad and frustrated by what desperate parents were willing to subject their usually very ill children and themselves in order to try some “cure” they had heard about: Expensive trips to “clinics” abroad, importation, often illegal, of unapproved “drugs”, all sorts of concoctions, it was really depressing. She told me once that this (literally) poor woman was desperate because she could not afford to buy her family’s groceries at Whole Foods, having been convinced that her kid’s tumor was a result of not having been fed organic foods.

      1. MTK says:

        Isidore,

        Have you seen how many hospitals and university medical programs now have “integrated” medicine as part of their offerings? Just look at the recent brouhaha at the Cleveland Clinic. Just go to their Wellness Center and you’ll see that they offer acupuncture, Reiki, interactive guided imagery (whatever that is), etc.

        I don’t think there’s any doubt more people are turning to alternative medicine than 10, 20, or 30 years ago. Or at least more money to be made at it which is essentially the same thing.

        I’m not blaming the desperate people, because desperate people do desperate things. What I am saying is that it’s easier to prey on those people when the overall trust in our institutions has eroded and when people believe the shysters, malcontents, and dumbasses as much, if not more, than legitimate scientists and professionals.

        1. Cynical1 says:

          Guided imagery is used by licensed mental health practitioners in counseling. Although mental health counseling is often treated with disdain by many scientists, there are many people who deal successfully with a myriad of conditions such as depression, OCD, adjustment disorders, anxiety etc. with mental health counseling. Just because it doesn’t and won’t work for everyone doesn’t mean that it’s all bullshit either. Let’s face it, anti-infectives are a rather unique drug class in the pharmaceutical arsenal. Most other drug classes often fail with very high percentage points for the very indication for which they are prescribed (and labeled). Oncology drugs are a perfect example of the lack of efficacy for often the majority of patients. You have to show increased efficacy over placebo, not efficacy for everyone.

          If the Cleveland clinic (which I know little about aside from their website which I did look up briefly) is using their integrated medicine clinic to address mental health and nutritional wellness for patients, I see no problem with that. Using drugs (like unregulated Chinese herbs which is also on their website) that have not been tested in controlled clinical trials to treat medical conditions is, however, very irresponsible.

          Disclaimer: I spent 30 years working in drug discovery and now, after being thrown to the curb too many times by the exalted pharmaceutical industry for no good reason, help run a counseling center instead. At our clinic, we don’t specialize in “woo”. All of our counselors are state licensed and all of them help some people, just not all. Sort of like most FDA approved drugs.

          With all of that said, I don’t think guided imagery would work on me either…….but I am a cynical bastard. I actually know exactly how it works. But I also know that it does help some clients. My wife uses it. She’s a counselor and the owner. And she takes a statin to control her cholesterol, as well.Guided imagery is used by licensed mental health practitioners in counseling. Although mental health counseling is often treated with disdain by many scientists, there are many people who deal successfully with a myriad of conditions such as depression, OCD, adjustment disorders, anxiety etc. with mental health counseling. Just because it doesn’t and won’t work for everyone doesn’t mean that it’s all bullshit either. Let’s face it, anti-infectives are a rather unique drug class in the pharmaceutical arsenal. Most other drug classes often fail with very high percentage points for the very indication for which they are prescribed (and labeled). Oncology drugs are a perfect example of the lack of efficacy for often the majority of patients. You have to show increased efficacy over placebo, not efficacy for everyone.

          If the Cleveland clinic (which I know little about aside from their website which I did look up briefly) is using their integrated medicine clinic to address mental health and nutritional wellness for patients, I see no problem with that. Using drugs (like unregulated Chinese herbs which is also on their website) that have not been tested in controlled clinical trials to treat medical conditions is, however, very irresponsible.

          Disclaimer: I spent 30 years working in drug discovery and now, after being thrown to the curb too many times by the exalted pharmaceutical industry for no good reason, help run a counseling center instead. At our clinic, we don’t specialize in “woo”. All of our counselors are state licensed and all of them help some people, just not all. Sort of like most FDA approved drugs.

          With all of that said, I don’t think guided imagery would work on me either…….but I am a cynical bastard. I actually know exactly how it works. But I also know that it does help some clients. My wife uses it. She’s a counselor and the owner. And she takes a statin to control her cholesterol, as well.

          1. cynical1 says:

            Sorry for the double paste but this website won’t let you write something without timing you out……….

          2. NJBiologist says:

            Further to Cynical1’s point: anxiety and depression are surprisingly common comorbidities for chronic illnesses, often secondary to the illness. If you can control those with some add-on therapies that don’t interfere with the treatment of the illness, go for it–you’ll help the patient.

      2. zero says:

        Whole Foods sells homeopathic ‘medicine’. My neighborhood drugstore does as well. Sickening. It’s not just snake-oil salesmen peddling lies; these are products sitting on store shelves.

    2. Phil says:

      Well, we could soon see the FDA headed up by a person who seems to believe that companies should be free to peddle useless non-remedies without restraint…

      “We should reform FDA so there is approving drugs after their sponsors have demonstrated safety–and let people start using them, at their own risk, but not much risk of safety. Let’s prove efficacy after they’ve been legalized.”

      1. DanielT says:

        I have to say I am rather sympathetic to avoiding the requirement for efficiency. Real and useful drugs were developed before 1963 and at much lower costs. It is not a simple question that demanding efficiency data is always good.

        1. tolrag says:

          Efficacy, not efficiency. As in proving that they have any effect.

        2. tangent says:

          It’s a fair argument, that pre-1963 wasn’t a pure hellscape of profiteers selling inefficacious drugs. On the other hand, look at the ‘supplements’ industry, which is a similar regulatory condition to what you’d roll pharma back to. I admit I’m not totally confident how we square the two.

          But I’m afraid profiteers have become more efficient, and would exploit the hell out of the pre-1963 situation. Just start with how drugs are advertised! And in general, quacks and hucksters we’ve always had, but now they’re sophisticated multinational machines.

          1. loupgarous says:

            Since marketing is roughly half the budget for a new drug roll-out, a win-win case could be made to Trump and his people for banning direct-to-patient marketing, as well as gratuities to prescribers and their staffs from drug reps (I never paid for Friday lunch while I worked at a multispecialty cardiology clinic – the detail reps would set up outdoor buffets in the parking lot – roast beef po-boys, seafood of every imaginable edible species, and ten-gallon batches of trifle). Much more money’s involved in direct-to-patient ads and gratuities to prescribers than in Phase III trials. All the marketing information about new drugs prescribers and patients need is in package inserts, and a Congress serious about cutting drug costs needs to know that.

          2. tangent says:

            @loupgarous, I strongly disagree with you on some things, but we agree on that one. DTC drug marketing has been a miserable failure, and schmoozing doctors is scummy. I’d give due credit to the Devil himself if he banned those, enforced the ban effectively, and succeeded on having no more than, say, 50% of the problem transmute into a new form.

            Which is tough, I don’t envy the Devil that job. Companies will absolutely push the boundaries, in sophisticated and well-lobbied ways, or just deniably blow past the boundaries and budget for the fines if that pencils out for them. You can think of half a dozen ways to try off the top of your head, probably.

      2. loupgarous says:

        From 2009-2015, we had an FDA commissioner who was married to the co-CEO of a hedge fund with massive holdings in pharmaceutical companies. While I understand that the couple’s personal holdings in pharmaceutical companies were placed in blind trusts or sold off, there remains the issue of the couple’s wealth being influenced by the success or failure of companies held by the husband’s hedge fund. This was an appointment made by Barack Obama, who promised us unprecedented transparency and honesty in government.

        I hope Donald Trump appoints a well-qualified Agency commissioner to FDA. But he’d have to work hard to find a candidate with more troubling issues than Obama did.

        1. Pennpenn says:

          I’m sure he’d manage it, I mean, his apparent choices so far in other fields haven’t been promising. Or worse, promising a whole lot of suffering. The only thing I think I could ever trust the Trumpalope to manage is to make things worse.

          1. loupgarous says:

            Based on which specific evidence? We know that Obama appointed the wife of a guy whose firm owned a ton of drug company stocks as FDA commissioner, which is either heroic incompetence, heroic indifference to ethics, or heroic corruption on the part of the Obama administration. If you have evidence apart from the clear evidence you hate Donald Trump to support your views, we’d like to see it.

          2. Pennpenn says:

            Well in terms of appointing people who will almost certainly make things worse, Betsy DeVos is certainly worth consideration.

            Trump is deserving of the hate he gets, and will deserve more by the time he’s out of office (sooner would be better than later).

  12. Marcus Welby says:

    I really believe that you need to take a more holistic view of disease and stop thinking so negatively. It is well known that CO2 is toxic and is more soluble at high pH. Bad DNA tautomers are also destabilzed in an alkaline environment.

    1. Bicarb says:

      Wait, if CO2 is more soluble at high pH, then why would you want your blood to become more alkaline? That would cause your blood to have more CO2 dissolved in it, right?

      1. Marcus Welby says:

        The key to this paradox is that CO2 is dissolved in alkali is no longer CO2. The alkali detoxifies the CO2 while destabilizing bad DNA tautomers. Many cancers have been linked to trace amounts of minor tautomeric forms of DNA bases (especially adenine).

        1. Some idiot says:

          Hang on, I want to try to get something straight… you are talking about DNA tautomers and alkali. But since the pH in the body is not affected by (for example) bicarbonate, this information (regardless of its truth or otherwise) is totally irrelevant…

          1. Marcus Welby says:

            The reference to DNA tautomers is complete and utter bullshit since you can’t perturb a tautomeric equilibrium by changing pH (interconversion of tautomers involves no net change in protonation state).

        2. Some idiot says:

          Quote: “Bad tautomers are also destabilised in an alkaline environment.” Quote from your first comment.

          Alkaline environment is the same as a higher pH than normal, by definition. Hence your later comment that “The reference to DNA tautomers is complete and utter bullshit since you can’t perturb a tautomeric equilibrium by changing pH” completely and utterly contradicts your first statement.

          Which one do you believe in? Or is there some other point you were trying to make?

          1. Phil says:

            Marcus: You can perturb tautomeric equilibrium via pH indirectly if by adjusting the pH you are changing the concentration of H-bond donors or H-bond acceptors. Take acetoacetone up in pure toluene and add acetic acid, you will see more and more of the keto form as the pH decreases.

            In water, you’re mostly right. H-bond donors everywhere, regardless of pH.

  13. sgcox says:

    But, as a positive, you will decrease the amount of green gases in atmosphere – mostly by stopping exhaling of course.
    BTW, how much CO2 we exhale per day (which comes from the whole body metabolism transferred to lungs by blood) compared to amount you get in by in injection in that criminal clinic ?

  14. There’s an amazing recent documentary called “Nuts!” about Dr. John Romulus Brinkley, who got rich by convincing people that goat testicle implants would be good for whatever ailed them (link in my name).

    1. Peter Kenny says:

      In Aldous Huxley’s “After Many A Summer (Dies The Swan)” it’s Dr Obispo and carp guts…

    2. cthulhu says:

      The marvelous mid-1920s short novel “Heart of a Dog” by Mikhail Bulgakov, a withering satire of the New Soviet Man, features a stray dog which gets implants of human organs, including testicles. Politically incorrect (at least from the USSR’s point of view) hilarity ensues…

  15. Matthew TKK says:

    Any effects on peroxynitrites?

    1. SedatedFMS says:

      Now now……..play nice.

  16. Insilicoconsulting says:

    It’s a scam like laetrile and other stuff. So he should pay with his head. But “pay ahead of time” is not so much different from a healthcare system that first asks you -: “are you covered?”, ” can u afford co-pays?”, ” your insurance does not cover it…” etc :-), ” please deposit so much in advance….”

  17. Bruce Grant says:

    “Be sure the funds are deposited” could also be the motto of Cancer Treatment Centers of America’s high-priced “integrative medicine” regimens for patients (100% self-pay) diagnosed with terminal cancer. Their degrees are real…but the hope is just as false.

  18. Noni Mausa says:

    A kind word about reiki — it’s not good for everything, it’s even contraindicated for some things, but it is deeply relaxing and involves no lemons or baking soda. I’ve had the training and have gotten and given treatments. (Really good for speeding up knitting of broken bones, once properly set, and pretty good adjunct therapy for anxiety and depression.) I guess if someone wanted to turn their reiki practice into a cures-everything circus, they could join the snake oil crowd, but that’s not how I was taught.

    1. US Chemist in Canada says:

      And how does it compare in such cases to a placebo of having someone lie down with their eyes closed for an hour?

      1. Jane says:

        Individually dependent. To me reiki is more stress reducing than lying in a dark room, but massage therapy is more stress reducing than reiki. I’ve got friends who prefer yoga to all 3. The gentleman working on visualization appears to deliver something similar. Everyone will be different in preference.

      2. Noni Mausa says:

        There are a number of things which, in theory, you could do by yourself (lying down and relaxing, for instance, or reading a bedtime story if you’re a small child) but which work far better if a second person is there coordinating the experience — even if they are silent, and don’t touch you, which is often the case with reiki treatments. So your suggestion is possible.

        I have experienced the difference in feel between a true reiki treatment versus some sympathetic hand waving, but as the difference is in how I feel, (either as subject or as therapist*) it’s hardly likely to convince you, or any other sensible researcher. Nor would I try. I just report my experience,

        Carry on, folks.

        * PS you can do reiki on yourself, too. Extremely relaxing.

    2. Jane says:

      I’ve tried it, it’s relaxing, reduced stress etc. Given how stress is a component of just about every major disease, I could see how it would benefit patients (note benefit not cure). It’s also not expensive. The amount of use a transient reduction in stress will be is going to be highly patient dependent.

  19. Vader says:

    Someone close to me suffers from fibromyalgia, to which she recently added interstitial cystitis. Mysterious conditions that probably reflect a real physical pathology, but no one knows exactly what is doing on with these patients.

    Such people get desperate. She is now going to a “functional physician” (e.g. quack) who has run numerous and expensive tests, which show a very high C-reactive protein level but otherwise are not diagnostic of any condition she is likely to have. She has been told she has high levels of uranium in her hair (well, we live in a mountainous state with lots of exposed granite) and rather high copper (but Wilson’s disease was ruled out long ago.) She has also been put on a bland diet that has disturbing overtones of trying to alter her pH. I can see trying to reduce the pH of her urine, given the bladder disorder, but I am concerned she’s going to develop scurvy, becuase ascorbic *acid*. No, really.

    It worries me, but I’m not sure I’m going to do any good by trying to shut this down. The placebo effect may be as helpful as anything at this point. Yeah, there’s an ethical dilemma there. Glad I’m not an M.D.

    1. Jane says:

      See if you can get her to try the relaxation, de-stress list instead. Unlike the crazy stuff she is trying now at least it won’t harm her. I’ve heard a lot of good things with fibromyalgia and stress reduction therapies. No one has a cure but relaxation does seem to help somewhat.

    2. loupgarous says:

      Your fibromyalgic friend’s in my thoughts. I once read a US Geological Survey paper showing that uranium’s widely distributed in the soils of Colorado, a phenomenon which tripped a scare about transuranics wafting across Denver from the Rocky Flats Plutonium Processing Plant. This scare was not entirely unjustified – the radiotoxin americium-241 has drifted so far from the old Rocky Flats site that the new toll road north of Denver that construction was only approved if motorists were forbidden tarry near the “hot spots”.

      However, tailings from an old radium mine formed the bed of a Denver side street, requiring the road to be taken up and its rock hauled off for secure disposal. Believers in the “no threshhold” theory of radiotoxicity (or heavy metal toxicity) would logically argue for the total evacuation of the state of Colorado. The place is literally made of heavy metals. The town of Telluride was so named because it was once paved with tailings from a mine for some other metal. Tellurium was that metal’s co-mineral.

    3. tangent says:

      Placebo doesn’t have to mean lying or misleading (though there have been some studies suggesting lying does work somewhat better). It can be “we don’t know for sure if this works, but some people say it did for them”, if the treatment is safe and priced in line with the placebo benefit. It can be what Jane suggests and saying “there may be a mind-body connection in fibromyalgia”, which to my limited knowledge is a completely fair statement.

      In situations where all options better than placebo have been exhausted, and only worse options remain, I’d say placebo is the standard of care, and should be offered. I don’t know enough about fibromyalgia and certainly not enough about your friend to comment whether that’s the case for her.

    4. Vader says:

      An update: She went to a neurologist yesterday because she has noticed trembling in her hands and weakness in her legs. Already had an MRI to rule out obvious neoplasm or lesions from MS.

      The neurologist looked at her history and tests and recommended she see a rheumatologist.

      Now I’m scratching my head why she hasn’t seen a rheumatologist already, with her sky-high C-reactive protein levels. Turns out the rheumatologists around here are so overworked they have put up high barriers to patient access — they won’t take any patient without a referral and they require all the preliminary testing be done when the patient arrives. There may be good reasons for that, but it kept my friend from seeing the rheumatologist in a timely manner.

  20. anon says:

    Can you still go to Houston, pay out the nose, and get “antineoplaston therapy”??

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