Skip to Content

Posts tagged with "Academia (vs. Industry)"

  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    Wasted Money, Wasted Time?

    Now, while we’ve been talking about how much basic research is done in industry, or how much clinical research gets done in academia, here’s something that might bear on the discussion. Too much of what looks like useful clinical research on the academic side is actually wasted effort. The New York Times has been running… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    Where Drugs Come From, and How. Once More, With A Roll of the Eyes

    I linked yesterday to a post by Megan McArdle about health care reform. And while I realize that everyone got into a shouting match in the comments to my own post on the subject – and people sure did in the comments to hers; it’s endemic – I wanted to quote a section from her… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    More Hot Air From Me on Screening

    After yesterday’s post on pathway patents, I figured that I should talk about high-throughput screening in academia. I realize that there are some serious endeavors going on, some of them staffed by ex-industry people. So I don’t mean to come across as thinking that academic screening is useless, because it certainly isn’t. What i… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    Competing (And Competing Unethically?)

    Sean Cutler, a biologist at UC-Riverside, is the corresponding author of a paper in a recent issue of Science. That’s always a good thing, of course, and people are willing to go to a lot of trouble to have something like that on their list of publications. But Cutler’s worried that too many scientists, especially… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    Poor Equipment Revisited

    A colleague came by a while ago and said “You know, the comments to that last post of yours are in danger of turning into Monty Python’s Four Yorkshiremen sketch“. At the moment, things are running about 50/50 between the “lack of equipment teaches you skills” and “lack of equipment wastes your time” camps. Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    The Perils of Poor Equipment

    The late Peter Medawar once wrote about resources and funding in research, and pointed out something that he thought did a lot more harm than good: various romantic anecdotes of people making do with ancient equipment, of great discoveries made with castoffs and antiques. While he didn’t deny that these were possible, and admitted that… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    More Than This

    Science is taking a look at the 1991 members of Yale’s Molecular Biology and Biophysics PhD program. The ostensible focus of the article is to see what the effect of flat federal research funding has been on young potential faculty members, but there’s a lot more to pick up on than that. The first thing… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    Lowe’s Law of Diurnal Distribution

    Here’s an appropriate topic for a Friday, although at first many of you may think I’ve lost my mind. What would happen if you combed the full text of the experimental sections of the chemistry journals, looking for how long people ran their reactions? I’m pretty sure that I know what you’d see: there would… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    Getting To Lyrica

    There’s an interesting article in Angewandte Chemie by Richard Silverman of Northwestern, on the discovery of Lyrica (pregabalin). It’s a rare example of a compound that came right out of academia to become a drug, but the rest of its story is both unusual and (in an odd way) typical. The drug is a very… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    Scrape Off Some Attitude

    There is a pecking order in chemistry. That’s because there’s one everywhere. If it’s a human endeavor, staffed by humans, you’re going to have hierarchies, real and perceived – who you did a post-doc with, what huge company you’re a big wheel in. But that doesn’t mean that we have to bow down to them… Read More
...111213...