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Posts tagged with "Academia (vs. Industry)"

  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    The Seat of Learning, Indeed

    I’ve got to take my, uh, hat off to this idea. Rebecca Schuman at Missouri-St. Louis, who writes frequently on academic hiring, made an offer late last week that directly addresses the problem that many aspiring faculty members find themselves facing: search committees apparently want bushels of stuff. And the strong suspicion is that they… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    Big Pharma And Its Research Publications

    A longtime reader sent along this article from the journal Technological Forecasting and Social Change, which I’ll freely admit never having spent much time with before. It’s from a team of European researchers, and it’s titled “Big Pharma, little science? A bibliometric perspective on Big Pharma’s R&D decline̶… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    The NIH Takes On Reproducibility

    Here’s more on the problems with non-reproducible results in the literature (see here for previous blog entries on this topic). Various reports over the last few years indicate that about half of the attention-getting papers can’t actually be replicated by other research groups, and the NIH seems to be getting worried about that: The gr… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    The NIH’s Drug Repurposing Program Gets Going

    Here’s an update on the NIH’s NCATS program to repurpose failed clinical candidates from the drug industry. I wrote about this effort here last year, and expressed some skepticism. It’s not that I think that trying drugs (or near-drugs) for other purposes is a bad idea prima facie, because it isn’t. I just wonder about… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    The Drug Industry and the Obama Administration

    Over at Forbes, John Osborne adds some details to what has been apparent for some time now: the drug industry seems to have no particular friends inside the Obama administration: Earlier this year I listened as a recently departed Obama administration official held forth on the industry and its rather desultory reputation. . .the substance… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    GSK’s Published Kinase Inhibitor Set

    Speaking about open-source drug discovery (such as it is) and sharing of data sets (such as they are), I really should mention a significant example in this area: the GSK Published Kinase Inhibitor Set. (It was mentioned in the comments to this post). The company has made 367 compounds available to any academic investigator working… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    Crowdfunding Research

    Crowdfunding academic research might be changing, from a near-stunt to an widely used method of filling gaps in a research group’s money supply. At least, that’s the impression this article at Nature Jobs gives: The practice has exploded in recent years, especially as success rates for research-grant applications have fallen in many pla… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    The NIH, Pfizer, and Senator Wyden

    Senator Ron Wyden (D-Oregon) seems to be the latest champion of the “NIH discovers drugs and Pharma rips them off” viewpoint. Here’s a post from John LaMattina on Wyden’s recent letter to Francis Collins. The proximate cause of all this seems to be the Pfizer JAK3 inhibitor: Tofacitinib (Xeljanz), approved last November by t… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    Yuri Milner’s Millions, And Where They’re Going

    You’ll have heard about Yuri Milner, the Russian entrepreneur (early Facebook investor, etc.) who’s recently announced some rather generous research prize awards: Yesterday, Milner, along with some “old friends”—Google cofounder Sergey Brin, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, and their respective wives—announced they are giving $33 m… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    Too Many Scientists: A “Pyramid Scheme”

    Chemistry World has really touched a lot of nerves with this editorial by economics professor Paula Stephan. It starts off with a look back to the beginnings of the NIH and NSF, Vannevar Bush’s “Endless Frontier”: . . .a goal of government and, indirectly, universities and medical schools, was to build research capacity by trainin… Read More
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