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Posts tagged with "Analytical Chemistry"

  • Analytical Chemistry

    Disorder and Order

    An interesting feature of many proteins is a disordered region down at the carboxy end. The reason for this feature has been obscure: if there’s part of the protein that just spends its days flailing around uselessly, why go to the trouble of translating it? Many of these tails certainly seem to have no defined structural… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    That One Serotonin Receptor

    Serotonin is perhaps the only neurotransmitter molecule that you could find named in a random poll, thanks to its association with antidepressants. (That association is far messier than popular opinion realizes, but that’s another topic). It’s a complicated one to have embraced, that’s for sure. There are 13 subtypes of GPCR serot… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Lab-Made Whiskey, Lab-Made Wine

    Via Chemjobber’s Twitter account comes a link to a really interesting Wall Street Journal story on a chemical approach to things like wine and whiskey (last explored here in this 2015 post). The startup company involved, Endless West, began by looking at the constituents of various types of wine and seeing if these flavor profiles… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Seeing Ethylene

    Plenty of people know that there’s a gas given off by ripe fruit that can itself accelerate ripening in others – the “banana in a bag” technique. That gas is of course ethylene, identified as such in plants in the early 20th century, and the more chemistry you know, the odder it seems that it… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Small Molecule Structures: A New World

    Word has been spreading rapidly about this preprint on Chemrxiv.org, from a joint UCLA/Caltech team. It details the use of the cryo-electron microscopy technique called micro-electron diffraction (MicroED) for the structure determination of small molecules, and it’s absolutely startling. I read it last night, with many exclamations along the… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Blue Light Coming Out of the NMR

    I really enjoyed this paper from Merck’s Process R&D group, but some readers will be saying “Yeah, but that’s just because you really enjoy photochemistry reactions”. The latter part is true, but it’s the sort of paper that we need to help drain some of the voodoo out of all the exciting photochemistry work that… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Knowing the Structure

    There are a lot of topics that we really should know more about in drug discovery, but which are buried inside projects inside particular organizations. Some of this knowledge is available once you’re inside said organization, but some of it is hard to assemble even then (much less into a review from outside). An example… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Sitting There For Five Hundred Million Years

    This paper is really a tour de force of analytical chemistry, because it does something that I didn’t think was possible. The team is looking at a rather ancient creature, Dickinsonia. In fact, you could argue that it’s the ancient creature, since it’s one of the Ediacaran organisms that are part of the first explosion… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    How Close is Cryo-EM To Riding Over the Horizon?

    OK, all this cryo-electron microscopy stuff is great, new protein structures, things that are huge, that can’t be crystallized, fine, fine: but when, the medicinal chemists in the audience ask, will we be able to use it for structure-based drug discovery? This new review tries to answer just that question. The first thing that you… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Cooling Crystals is Great. Except When It Isn’t.

    If you’ve ever been around an X-ray crystallography setup, one of the constants is a tube directing a blast of chilly vapor at the crystal that’s mounted for analysis. It’s usually a stream of cold nitrogen gas, often set up as a blast of the cold stuff surrounded by a second concentric layer of dry… Read More
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