Skip to Content

Posts tagged with "Analytical Chemistry"

  • Analytical Chemistry

    Masses of Data, In Every Sample

    I’ve said several times that I think that mass spectrometry is taking over the analytical world, and there’s more evidence of that in Angewandte Chemie. A group at Justus Liebig University in Giessen has built what has to be the finest imaging mass spec I’ve ever seen. It’s a MALDI-type machine, which means that a… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Calorimetry: What Say You?

    I’ve been involved in a mailing list discussion that I wanted to open up to a wider audience in drug discovery, so here goes. We spend our time (well, a lot of it, when we’re not filling out forms) trying to get compound to bind well to our targets. And that binding is, of course… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Sequenom: Strike Up the Music, Bring On the Cream Pies

    Now here’s a weird one. The San Diego diagnostics company Sequenom came up with a non-invasive test for Down’s Syndrome, and sold it to another outfit, Xenomics, for development. Update: I’ve got this transfer backwards – Xenomics licensed some of its nucleic acid technology to Sequenom, and has now regretted it. But late la… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    The Infinitely Active Impurity

    Yesterday’s post touched on something that all experienced drug discovery people have been through: the compound that works – until a new batch is made. Then it doesn’t work so well. What to do? You have a fork in the road here: one route is labeled “Blame the Assay” and the other one is “Blame… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Sure About That?

    There was a natural products paper (abstract) that I missed last fall which has finally come out in Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters. Let’s have a show of hands: how many chemists out there think that this structure is the correct one? Right. Going back through SciFinder, I don’t find any anti-Bredt cyclobutene structures of… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Run It Past the Chemists

    I missed this paper when it came out back in October: “Reactome Array: Forging a Link Between Metabolome and Genome“. I’d like to imagine that it was the ome-heavy title itself that drove me away, but I have to admit that I would have looked it over had I noticed it. And I probably should… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    GE Healthcare’s Idiotic Libel Suit

    Courtesy of Pharmalot (and my mail!), I note this alarming story from London. GE Healthcare makes a medical NMR contrast agent, a gadolinium complex marketed under the name of Omniscan. (They picked it up when they bought Amersham a few years ago). Henrik Thomsen, a Danish physician had noted what may be an association with… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Faking X-Ray Structures. . .For Fun? Or Profit? Or What?

    Well, this isn’t good: an ex-researcher at the University of Alabama-Birmingham has been accused of faking several X-ray structures of useful proteins – dengue virus protease, taq polymerase, complement proteins from immunology, etc. There have been questions surrounding H. M. Krishna Murthy’s work for at least a couple of years n… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Water and Proteins Inside Cells: Sloshing Around, Or Not?

    Back in September, talking about the insides of cells, I said: There’s not a lot of bulk water sloshing around in there. It’s all stuck to and sliding around with enzymes, structural proteins, carbohydrates, and the like. . .” But is that right? I was reading this new paper in JACS, where a group at… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    More Binding Site Weirdness

    Now here’s an oddity: medicinal chemists are used to seeing the two enantiomers (mirror image compounds, for those outside the field) showing different activity. After all, proteins are chiral, and can recognize such things – in fact, it’s a bit worrisome when the enantiomers don’t show different profiles against a protein t… Read More
...111213...