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Posts tagged with "Analytical Chemistry"

  • Analytical Chemistry

    So What Exactly is SCR7?

    Those of you who are into CRISPR will likely have heard for SCR7. It’s a compound added to the system that seems to enhance its efficiency and specificity, presumably through its inhibition of DNA ligase IV. That’s all fine – the mechanism makes sense, and making CRISPR more selective is a worthy goal that any… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    The Case For Non-Biogenic Tramadol

    The battle over whether tramadol is a natural product or not has been a heated one. Over the last couple of years, it was reported to be produced by a west African shrub, then this was reported to be an artifact of feeding the drug to cattle, and then this hypothesis was challenged by work… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Theranos And Its Blood Test Machine

    Theranos is a very high-profile startup doing blood tests. You’ve probably come across them (or their founder, Elizabeth Holmes), promoting “X number of tests from a single drop of blood” and so on. The company has been making a big splash since at least 2013, when this article in the Wall Street Journal came out (I keep… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Immunology, Under the Hood

    Here’s an example of the move to nanoscale that I was writing about the other day, but from the other end of the stick. As chemists have been moving up from small molecules to dealing with larger structures, biologists have been moving down from whole-cell studies to more detailed pictures of what’s happening locally. The… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Invisible Crystals Yield Structure

    A crystallographer colleague passes on this new paper, which I find very interesting and just a bit freaky. The authors (a collaboration between UCLA, HHMI, LBNL, and SLAC) are studying alpha-synuclein, the protein that aggregates in Parkinson’s disease pathology, and more particularly, they’re studying a short (11-amino acid) section o… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Irisin Fights Back

    Irisin is the so-called “exercise hormone”, and it’s been the subject of a lot of controversy since its discovery. Not everyone is convinced that it even exists in humans, and a paper earlier this year flat-out called it a myth, which is something that you don’t see very often in the scientific literature. Now the… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Asphalt, Up Close and Personal

    I wrote not long ago about another use of atomic force microscopy images to determine chemical structures, and now here’s another paper on the same general topic. Pretty soon, this is going to become too common to note, and structure determination will have changed forever (once again!) Shown are some asphaltenes – and if you’ve… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Let’s Just Braille Out That Chemical Structure, Shall We?

    Atomic force microscopy, a technique that has given us images of individual atoms and molecules, has racked up another success. A collaboration between the IBM-Zürich group (who have done so much in this area) and a group at the University of Santiago de Compostela (in Spain) has determined the structure of a reactive intermediate, and… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Picky, Picky NMR Magnets

    Unless you’ve had to take care of an NMR facility, you might not have realized how many large chunks of ferromagnetic material might be moving around close to your building, and how much stray radio-frequency noise is banging around. Here’s a story on the University of Minnesota, where a research building sits right next to… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Cryo-EM On the March

    Cryo-electron microscopy has been scoring some real successes lately as a structural biology technique. Anything that provides protein structures without having to crystallize proteins is of immediate interest, of course, and I think we can expect a lot more work in this area. Here’s a review on the current state of the art, for those… Read More
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