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Posts tagged with "Analytical Chemistry"

  • Analytical Chemistry

    Invisible Crystals Yield Structure

    A crystallographer colleague passes on this new paper, which I find very interesting and just a bit freaky. The authors (a collaboration between UCLA, HHMI, LBNL, and SLAC) are studying alpha-synuclein, the protein that aggregates in Parkinson’s disease pathology, and more particularly, they’re studying a short (11-amino acid) section o… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Irisin Fights Back

    Irisin is the so-called “exercise hormone”, and it’s been the subject of a lot of controversy since its discovery. Not everyone is convinced that it even exists in humans, and a paper earlier this year flat-out called it a myth, which is something that you don’t see very often in the scientific literature. Now the… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Asphalt, Up Close and Personal

    I wrote not long ago about another use of atomic force microscopy images to determine chemical structures, and now here’s another paper on the same general topic. Pretty soon, this is going to become too common to note, and structure determination will have changed forever (once again!) Shown are some asphaltenes – and if you’ve… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Let’s Just Braille Out That Chemical Structure, Shall We?

    Atomic force microscopy, a technique that has given us images of individual atoms and molecules, has racked up another success. A collaboration between the IBM-Zürich group (who have done so much in this area) and a group at the University of Santiago de Compostela (in Spain) has determined the structure of a reactive intermediate, and… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Picky, Picky NMR Magnets

    Unless you’ve had to take care of an NMR facility, you might not have realized how many large chunks of ferromagnetic material might be moving around close to your building, and how much stray radio-frequency noise is banging around. Here’s a story on the University of Minnesota, where a research building sits right next to… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Cryo-EM On the March

    Cryo-electron microscopy has been scoring some real successes lately as a structural biology technique. Anything that provides protein structures without having to crystallize proteins is of immediate interest, of course, and I think we can expect a lot more work in this area. Here’s a review on the current state of the art, for those… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    The Tramadol Wars

    You may recall the report of the synthetic analgesic tramadol as a natural product from Cameroon, and the subsequent report that it was nothing of the kind. (That’s the paper that brought the surprising news that local farmers were feeding the drug to their cows). Now the first group (a team from Nantes, Lodz, and… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Tiny (And Not So Tiny) Changes

    A huge amount of medicinal chemistry – and a huge amount of medicine – depends on small molecules binding to protein targets. Despite decades of study, though, with all the technology we can bring to bear on the topic, we still don’t have as clear a picture of the process as we’d like. Protein structure… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    X-Ray Sponges Ride Again

    The Fujita group has a new paper out on their “crystalline sponge” method for X-ray structure determination. I had the chance to hear Prof. Fujita speak on this recently – a very interesting talk indeed – and I’ve been looking forward to the paper. (Here’s a summary from an equally impressed Quintus). This time,… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Quenching NMRs, Accidentally and On Purpose

    You may remember the MRI accident in India, where someone brought an oxygen tank into the imaging room. The consequence were not good ones – not only did two people get pinned to the machine by said tank, it took hours for them to kill the magnet because the emergency quench circuit was deactivated. A… Read More
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