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Posts tagged with "Biological News"

  • Biological News

    The Landscape of Kinase Inhibitors

    I’ve been meaning to link to this article, which is the best overview I know of for kinase inhibitors. The authors (a large multicenter team led out of Munich) characterize 243 (!) kinase inhibitors that have made it into human trials across a very wide range of the known kinase enzymes, and the result is… Read More
  • Biological News

    Mistreating Enzymes For a Good Cause

    What happens when you chuck an active enzyme into the wrong solvent? Well, it stops working (or at the very least, it stops working as well as it did). And how do you know which one is the wrong solvent? Why, those are the ones that make it stop working. That round trip is to… Read More
  • Biological News

    CRISPR and Axovant: What the Market Thinks

    Let’s go to the NASDAQ for some insight on a couple of recent biopharma stories. First off is Axovant, a company that’s interesting in a number of distressing ways. I last wrote about them here, after their Alzheimer’s candidate came up short in the clinic, which was a development that surprised no one who had… Read More
  • Biological News

    Genetic Variation Gets More Real All the Time

    This study goes firmly into the file marked “You never could have done this one a few years ago, sonny”. We already know that there’s genetic variation in every population and in every individual. And we know that a large number of marketed drugs (about a third of them) target G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). But… Read More
  • Biological News

    CRISPR: The Latest Edition

    There’s a rather large breakthrough in CRISPR gene editing – yeah, another one – that has downstream implications for drug discovery. A group at the Salk Institute reports in Cell that they’ve found a way to do both loss- and gain-of-function without double-stranded DNA breaking. That’s quite different from the various… Read More
  • Biological News

    Small Proteins: Into the Gap

    We medicinal chemists are used to thinking about small molecule drugs – it’s what we do. And we’re also comfortable with having a category in our worldview that we assign to “biologics” – proteins, mostly, many of them antibodies, which can also be extremely therapeutically effective under the right conditions. B… Read More
  • Biological News

    Bad Cells. So Many Bad Cells.

    Let’s file this one under “We’ve seen this before, and I’ll bet we’ll see it again”. Anyone who’s worked for some years in cell culture (or with people who have) should appreciate the dangers of cell line contamination. You can get mycoplasma, you can get other cell lines entirely (particularly others that… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    A Nobel for Cryo-EM

    The Chemistry Nobel committee seems to have taken everyone by surprise today with their award for cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). That’s not because it isn’t Nobel-worthy, though – it certainly is. But they tend to take their time before recognizing discoveries (ask 95-year-old John Goodenough, a key inventor of the lithium ba… Read More
  • Biological News

    A Nobel for Circadian Rhythm

    How many people had their bets down on circadian rhythm for the Medicine/Physiology Nobel this year? Not many, I’d think, and that includes one of the actual laureates. The three winners are Michael Rosbash and Jeffrey Hall of Brandeis (a university that I can literally see outside the window of my train as I write… Read More
  • Biological News

    The Blind Watchmaker’s Workshop

    Did it have to be this way? I mean all of it – biochemistry, the molecules of life. More specifically, as proteins evolve and change, how many paths could they have taken that would have taken them to the same sorts of function? That’s a pretty hard question to answer, since we’re looking at a… Read More
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