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Posts tagged with "Biological News"

  • Biological News

    Cancer Cells Are Even Worse Than We Thought

    There are a lot of cancer cell lines out there, and many of them get used a lot, too. It’s not surprising, in a way, because these are cells that have already (and unfortunately) proven themselves to be robust and fast-growing, so many of these lines tend to take to cell culture conditions pretty well. Read More
  • Biological News

    GPCRs: Peeling The Onion Some More

    I like to say that when I was first working on G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) as drug targets, that after I while I thought I really understood a lot of what was going on. But that was the peak. Further experience eroded that confidence, and even though I’ve learned a lot more about them over… Read More
  • Biological News

    Cells Like Turbulence. Well, Some Cells.

    Let’s talk cell culture – specifically, how weird it is. There are an awful lot of ways to grow cells, naturally – different media of course, different scales, differences in how crowded you let them get, how often you split them, add nutrients, wash them, all those things. All of those make sense to me… Read More
  • Biological News

    You Don’t Understand Long Noncoding RNAs

    Let’s confuse ourselves thoroughly and talk about long noncoding RNA. It’s just part of the menagerie of RNA species that have come to light over the last twenty years, of course, and honestly you can confuse yourself with any of them. But just asking “what are lncRNAs doing?” is enough right there. They’re lengthy str… Read More
  • Biological News

    A Close Look at a Cancer Genome

    Ever since gene sequencing became feasible (for several values of “feasible”!) it’s been of great interest to look at the genetic material of cancerous cells. It’s been clear from very early on that there are many changes, mutations, rearrangements, shifts, etc. in a cancer cell’s DNA, and it’s been equally clear… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Clicked DNA: From Lab Curiosity to Analytical Technique

    I’ve written a few times about an odd sort of unnatural DNA sequence, where some of the nucleotides are connected via “click” triazole units rather than the traditional polyphosphate backbone. I remember wondering what the chemical biology community would make out of these things, and I wanted to report on at least one ingenious a… Read More
  • Biological News

    The Fuzzy Free-For-All

    I wrote here about the way that disordered proteins seem to be able to bind together tightly in the apparent absence of a defined structure, and along the way I expressed a desire not to lead any drug discovery efforts against such systems. Now here’s another example of protein fuzziness, and I can’t say that… Read More
  • Biological News

    Alarmingly Functional Disorder

    Let’s think for a bit about how proteins bind to each other. After all, messing around with that is what keeps everyone in the drug industry employed, and the unmessed varieties of such binding events are what keep us all vertical and above room temperature, so it’s a worthy subject. The mental picture is of… Read More
  • Biological News

    Zap the Zinc

    Zinc – can’t live without it, can’t get rid of it. That about sums up the situation with trying to figure out the metal’s many important roles in biology. A long, long list of proteins have zinc-binding functions (with the metalloproteases and the DNA-binding zinc-finger domains being two important ones that immediately come… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Calcium Probe Problems

    Fluorescent dyes and probes are wonderful things, and they have been absolutely crucial to our understanding of cellular biology. Being able to see specific protein types and cellular structures in real time through a microscope with dyes, being able to monitor things like calcium flux, oxidative stress, pH and so on through fluorescent probe molec… Read More
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