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Posts tagged with "Biological News"

  • Biological News

    New, Improved DNA?

    As all organic chemists who follow the literature know, over the last few years there’s been a strong swell of papers using Barry Sharpless’s “click chemistry” triazole-forming reactions. These reaction let you form five-membered triazole rings from two not-very-reactive partners, an azide and an acetylene, and people have been putting them… Read More
  • Biological News

    Receptors: Can’t Live With ‘Em, Can’t Understand ‘Em

    At various points in my drug discovery career, I’ve worked on G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) targets. Most everyone in the drug industry has at some point – a significant fraction of the known drugs work through them, even though we have a heck of a time knowing what their structures are like. For those outside the… Read More
  • Biological News

    Killing Proteins Wholesale

    Benjamin Cravatt at Scripps has another interesting paper out this week – by my standards, he hasn’t published very many dull ones. I spoke about some earlier work of his here, where his group tried to profile enzymes in living cells and found that the results they got were much different than the ones seen… Read More
  • Biological News

    Empty As Can Be

    OK, drugs generally bind to some sort of cavity in a protein. So what’s in that cavity when the drug isn’t there? Well, sometimes it’s the substance that the drug is trying to mimic or block, the body’s own ligand doing what it’s supposed to be doing. But what about when that isn’t occupying the… Read More
  • Biological News

    Nanotech Stem Cells, Order Now!

    A good rule to follow: hold onto your wallet when two exciting, complicated fields of research are combined. Nature reported earlier this spring on a good example of this, the announcement by a small biotech called Primegen that they’d used carbon nanotubes to reprogram stem cells. (Here’s a good article from VentureBeat on the same… Read More
  • Biological News

    RNA Interference: Even Trickier Than You Thought

    It’s been a while since I talked about RNA interference here. It’s still one of those tremendously promising therapeutic ideas, and it’s still having a tremendously hard time proving itself. Small RNA molecules can do all sorts of interesting and surprising things inside cells, but the trick is getting them there. Living systems are not… Read More
  • Biological News

    Getting Real With Real Cells

    I’ve been reading an interesting paper from JACS with the catchy title of “Optimization of Activity-Based Probes for Proteomic Profiling of Histone Deacetylase Complexes”. This is work from Benjamin Cravatt’s lab at Scripps, and it says something about me, I suppose, that I found that title of such interest that I immediately printed of… Read More
  • Biological News

    Rainbows and Fishing Expeditions

    I came across a neat article in Nature from a group working on a new technique in neuroscience imaging. They expressed an array of four differently colored fluorescent proteins in developing neurons in vivo, and placed them so that recombination events would scramble the relative expression of the multiple transgenes as the cell population expands. Read More
  • Biological News

    Avandia: Going Under for the Third Time?

    How many hits can a drug – or a whole class of drugs – take? Avandia (rosiglitazone) has been the subject of much wrangling about cardiovascular risk in its patient population of Type II diabetics. But there have also been scattered reports of increases in fractures among people taking it or Actos (pioglitazone), the other… Read More
  • Biological News

    A Real Genetic Headscratcher

    As you root through genomic sequences – and there are more and more of them to root through these days – you come across some stretches of DNA that hardly seem to vary at all. The hard-core “ultraconserved” parts, first identified in 2004, are absolutely identical between mice, rats, and humans. Our last common ancestor… Read More
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