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Posts tagged with "Cancer"

  • Business and Markets

    Nivien’s Shot

    Have you ever heard of Nivien Therapeutics? Unless you follow the oncology world pretty closely, probably not. But they are – well, were – a startup out of Harvard that was working on a promising approach to overcoming chemotherapy resistance in pancreatic cancer. Now that’s what we call an “unmet medical need”, consid… Read More
  • Biological News

    Tumor-Specific Antigens From Way Out There

    The pileup in immuno-oncology is already the stuff of legend: it’s difficult to even count the number of therapies, combinations, and clinical trials that are underway or in development. And that’s for good reason, of course – the promise here is huge, the field is wide open, and there are vast tracts of things that… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Worse Than Useless

    Time for another look at AbbVie’s work on Rova-T (an antibody-drug conjugate targeting the tumor antigen DLL3), and for some hard thoughts about what drug development is really like. The last time I wrote about this program, things didn’t look good. Now they look even worse. A Phase III trial of the drug has been… Read More
  • Cancer

    Mannose and Cancer

    I’m always happy to see something show up in the research literature that can be immediately applied in clinical practice. Working in drug discovery, you get used to everything maybe having an impact years in the future, if everything works out (and it rarely does!) So when you see an actionable idea that applies to… Read More
  • Cancer

    PI3K Inhibitors: You’re Doing It Wrong

    Now here’s an interesting connection between cancer and metabolism, with what look to be direct implications for therapy. A large research team (mostly working out of Weill Cornell) reports some new and important details about PI3K inhibitors, a class of kinase inhibitors that has seen a very large amount of development work indeed. I’v… Read More
  • Cancer

    Bromopyruvate Revealed

    3-bromopyruvate is an interesting and controversial compound. It’s been reported to be an active chemotherapy agent, apparently acting via covalent inhibition of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and subsequent metabolic effects via loss of pyruvate itself. Several years ago, you could come across numerous web pages touting it… Read More
  • Cancer

    Drug Repurposing, Computed

    Here’s an example of something that we’re all going to see more of in the coming years: the computational approach to biochemical pathway discovery and (potentially) new therapies. In this case, the authors are looking at some pretty intractable tumor types (type 3 and type 4 medulloblastoma), which is a good place for discovery in… Read More
  • Cancer

    Replacing Antibodies With Small Molecules

    As anyone who’s been following the oncology field knows, antibodies against either the PD-1 receptor or its ligand PD-L1 are about the biggest things going in the field right now. Hundreds of clinical trials are underway against various tumor types and in various combinations, in the effort to see how far the immuno-oncology idea can… Read More
  • Cancer

    The Cancer Stem Cell Saga

    In this 2015 post I looked at the cancer stem cell field – the idea that some tumor types are kept going by a stem cell population, and that unless these are dealt with, no durable response to treatment can be expected. A number of pharma companies have looked into this idea, most famously (and… Read More
  • Cancer

    A Nobel for Immuno-Oncology

    As many had expected, the Nobel prize in medicine/physiology this year recognizes advances in immuno-oncology: James Allison (for CTLA4) and Tasuku Honjo (PD-1). For some years now, that has been a huge, massive, unstoppable wave in cancer research, and I would not want to try to estimate how much time, effort, and money has gone… Read More
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