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Posts tagged with "Cancer"

  • Cancer

    PI3K Inhibitors: You’re Doing It Wrong

    Now here’s an interesting connection between cancer and metabolism, with what look to be direct implications for therapy. A large research team (mostly working out of Weill Cornell) reports some new and important details about PI3K inhibitors, a class of kinase inhibitors that has seen a very large amount of development work indeed. I’v… Read More
  • Cancer

    Bromopyruvate Revealed

    3-bromopyruvate is an interesting and controversial compound. It’s been reported to be an active chemotherapy agent, apparently acting via covalent inhibition of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and subsequent metabolic effects via loss of pyruvate itself. Several years ago, you could come across numerous web pages touting it… Read More
  • Cancer

    Drug Repurposing, Computed

    Here’s an example of something that we’re all going to see more of in the coming years: the computational approach to biochemical pathway discovery and (potentially) new therapies. In this case, the authors are looking at some pretty intractable tumor types (type 3 and type 4 medulloblastoma), which is a good place for discovery in… Read More
  • Cancer

    Replacing Antibodies With Small Molecules

    As anyone who’s been following the oncology field knows, antibodies against either the PD-1 receptor or its ligand PD-L1 are about the biggest things going in the field right now. Hundreds of clinical trials are underway against various tumor types and in various combinations, in the effort to see how far the immuno-oncology idea can… Read More
  • Cancer

    The Cancer Stem Cell Saga

    In this 2015 post I looked at the cancer stem cell field – the idea that some tumor types are kept going by a stem cell population, and that unless these are dealt with, no durable response to treatment can be expected. A number of pharma companies have looked into this idea, most famously (and… Read More
  • Cancer

    A Nobel for Immuno-Oncology

    As many had expected, the Nobel prize in medicine/physiology this year recognizes advances in immuno-oncology: James Allison (for CTLA4) and Tasuku Honjo (PD-1). For some years now, that has been a huge, massive, unstoppable wave in cancer research, and I would not want to try to estimate how much time, effort, and money has gone… Read More
  • Cancer

    A Run of Contrary Results

    From the outside, medical progress looks a lot easier than it really is. Well, I realize that’s true of a lot of things, but it’s especially true in progress against disease, and that’s especially especially true (as I’ve said here before) when you’re talking about dietary influences and what can be learned from them.… Read More
  • Cancer

    The BRCA1 Gene: Trouble, Quantified

    Add this to the (increasingly long) list of papers whose basic research plans would once have gotten a net dropped over your head. It’s looking at variations in the BRCA1 gene, the one that is famously associated with breast cancer risk. There is no doubt at all that there are mutations in this gene that raise… Read More
  • Biological News

    Switching On Innate Immunity

    Cells couldn’t have a hope of working if they weren’t tightly spatially organized. The nucleus vs. the cytosol (and the cell membrane itself) are the two most obvious partitions, and then you have specialized organelles like the mitochondria, et very much cetera, dividing things further. Life itself is organized around things being diff… Read More
  • Biological News

    Cancer Cells Are Even Worse Than We Thought

    There are a lot of cancer cell lines out there, and many of them get used a lot, too. It’s not surprising, in a way, because these are cells that have already (and unfortunately) proven themselves to be robust and fast-growing, so many of these lines tend to take to cell culture conditions pretty well. Read More
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