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Posts tagged with "Cancer"

  • Biological News

    Turmoil in Immuno-oncology

    Immuno-oncology! It’s such a big deal, let’s just do what everyone in the field is doing and call it “IO”. The recent successes in this area have rearranged every company’s oncology strategy, in some cases rearranging its entire oncology portfolio right out the door. There are several possibilities open to you now, if… Read More
  • Cancer

    Kite’s Latest News

    Readers will surely recall the problems that surfaced last year with Juno’s CAR-T cell therapy program. There were a number of patient deaths, and worried onlookers were wondering how their competitor, Kite Pharma, was doing. Well, now there’s word that a patient in one of their trials has died from what’s described as multiple or… Read More
  • Biological News

    MELK Is Not A Cancer Target. Surprise!

    The Maternal Embryonic Leucine zipper Kinase (MELK) is definitely an interesting enzyme. It’s been implicated in a number of cancer cell lines, and it also has important roles in the normal cell cycle, in embryogenesis, and other functions. It’s one of those proteins that’s found all across mammalian (and non-mammalian) species,… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    PARP Inhibitors Do It Again

    When we last looked in on the long-running saga of PARP inhibitors around here, Tesaro had posted excellent clinical results for their compound and re-invigorated the whole field. At the time, I wrote “It’ll be quite interesting to see the clinical results of the other PARP compounds in this light. You’d expect more differences to… Read More
  • Cancer

    Nativis Lives the Life

    I sort of hate to bring them up again, but a reader sent along this link to a story at Geekwire, all about how there’s a Seattle company has raised $10 million for their new cancer-fighting device “that uses electromagnetic fields to mimic the effects of drugs” and yeah. . .it’s Nativis again. Here’s the… Read More
  • Cancer

    An IBM-Watson Collaboration Goes Under

    I’ve written several times about IBM’s Watson machine learning system and its potential applications to health care. To be honest, many of these applications sound unlikely, at least at present, and that skepticism doesn’t apply only to IBM by any means. Now word comes that a collaboration between IBM and the M. D. Anderson peopl… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    The Soon-Shiong Hype Machine

    I have long been suspicious of people who use the word “moonshot” in the context of biomedical research. It’s lazy shorthand for “We’re going to spend a lot of money in a shorter period of time than usual”, and (as has been pointed out time without number), that approach was pretty suitable for the Apollo… Read More
  • Cancer

    Be Sure The Funds Are Deposited

    I’ve written before here about the many people who are convinced that most (or all) diseases have to do with the body’s pH – most often, you hear that your body has to be alkaline, and that cancer and other diseases are associated with acidity. To save time, I will stipulate that this is bullshit. Read More
  • Biological News

    A First Look at Reproducibility in Cancer Biology

    I’ve been waiting for these results: the Reproducibility Project (Cancer Biology) has been going back over several prominent papers in the field, seeing how well their results hold up. This follows a similar effort in experimental psychology, where the results were mixed. The hopes here were to reproduce 50 high-profile studies, but as this N… Read More
  • Cancer

    What Passes For Positive Data

    So can someone explain this one for me? Halozyme has a hyaluoronidase enzyme (PEGPH20) that they’re developing as a therapeutic agent. The idea is that it’s going to be an add-on with other cancer therapeutic combinations, and would increase the exposure of the tumor cells to the actual chemotherapies by breaking down hyaluronan (hyalur… Read More
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