Skip to Content

Posts tagged with "Chemical Biology"

  • Chemical Biology

    Chemical Biology Highlights

    Here’s a worthwhile paper from Donna Huryn, Lynn Resnick, and Peter Wipf on the academic contributions to chemical biology in recent years. They’re not only listing what’s been done, they’re looking at the pluses and minuses of going after probe/tool compounds in this setting: The academic setting provides a unique environme… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    A Short Peptide And A Small Molecule

    Just as a quick example of how odd molecular recognition can be, have a look at this paper from Chemical Communications. It’s not particularly remarkable, but it’s a good example of what’s possible. The authors used a commercial phage display library (this one, I think) to run about a billion different 12-mer peptides past the… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Chemical Probes Versus Drugs

    Nature Chemical Biology has an entire issue on target selection and target validation, and it looks well worth a read. I’ll have more to say about some of the articles in it, but I wanted to mention a point that comes up in the introductory comment, “Stay On Target”. This is the key point: “Chemical… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    The DNA-Encoded Library Platform Yields A Hit

    I wrote here about DNA-barcoding of huge (massively, crazily huge) combichem libraries, a technology that apparently works, although one can think of a lot of reasons why it shouldn’t. This is something that GlaxoSmithKline bought by acquiring Praecis some years ago, and there are others working in the same space. For outsiders, the question… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Using DNA to Make Your Polymers. No Enzymes Needed.

    Here’s an ingenious use for DNA that never would have occurred to me. David Liu and co-workers have been using DNA-templated reactions for some time, though, so it’s the sort of thing that would have occurred to them: using the information of a DNA sequence to make other kinds of polymers entirely. The schematic above… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Selective Inhibitor, The Catalog Says

    There’s an interesting addendum to yesterday’s post about natural product fragments. Dan Erlanson was pointing out that many of the proposed fragments were PAINS, and that prompted Jonathan Baell (author of the original PAINS paper) to leave a comment there mentioning this compound. Yep, you can buy that beast from Millipore, and itR… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    So How Does One Grow Beta-Cells?

    The short answer is “by looking for compounds that grow beta cells”. That’s the subject of this paper, a collaboration between Peter Schulz’s group, the Novartis GNF. Schultz’s group has already published on cell-based phenotypic screens in this area, where they’re looking for compounds that could be useful in re… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Halogen Bonds

    Here’s a recent paper in J. Med. Chem. on halogen bonding in medicinal chemistry. I find the topic interesting, because it’s an effect that certainly appears to be real, but is rarely (if ever) exploited in any kind of systematic way. Halogens, especially the lighter fluorine and chlorine, are widely used substituents in medicinal chemi… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    More on the Parabon NSF Press Release

    Well, I’ve been away from the computer a good part of the day, but I return to find that the author of the NSF press release that I spoke unkindly of has shown up in the comments to that post. I’m going to bring those up here to make sure that his objections get a… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Parabon’s DNA Structures: What The Hey?

    I’m having a real problem understanding this press release from the NSF. I’ve been looking at it for a few days now (it’s been sent to me a couple of times in e-mail), and I still can’t get a handle on it. And I’m not the only one. I see just this morning that Chemobber… Read More
...91011...