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Posts tagged with "Chemical Biology"

  • Chemical Biology

    Making the Bacteria Make Your Fluorinated Compounds

    Acetate is used in vivo as a starting material for all sorts of ridiculously complex natural products. So here’s a neat idea: why not hijack those pathways with fluoroacetate and make fluorinated things that no one’s ever seen before? That’s the subject of this new paper in Science, from Michelle Chang’s lab at Berkeley. The… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Chemistry On The End of DNA

    We chemists have always looked at the chemical machinery of living systems with a sense of awe. A billion years of ruthless pruning (work, or die) have left us with some bizarrely efficient molecular catalysts, the enzymes that casually make and break bonds with a grace and elegance that our own techniques have trouble even… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Evolving Enzymes: Let ‘Em Rip

    Evolutionary and genetic processes fascinate many organic chemists, and with good reason. They’ve provided us with the greatest set of chemical catalysts we know of: enzymes, which are a working example of molecular-level nanotechnology, right in front of us. A billion years of random tinkering have accomplished a great deal, but (being human… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Ben Cravatt At The Challenges In Chemical Biology Conference

    Ben Cravatt is talking about this work on activity-based protein profiling of serine hydrolase enzymes. That’s quite a class to work on – as he says, up to 2% of all the proteins in the body fall into this group, but only half of them have had even the most cursory bit of characterization. Even… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Kurt Deshayes At The Challenges in Chemical Biology Conference

    Kurt Deshayes of Genentech has been speaking at the Challenges in Chemical Biology meeting, on protein-protein inhibitor work. And he’s raised a number of issues that I think that we in drug discovery are going to have to deal with. For one thing, given the size of PPI clinical molecules like ABT-199, what does that… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    DNA Can Be Messed With More Than You’d Think

    Ali Tavassoli has just given a very interesting talk at the Challenges in Chemical Biology conference on his SICLOPPS method for generating huge numbers of cyclic peptides to screen for inhibitors of protein-protein interactions. I’ll do a post in detail on that soon; it’s one of those topics I’ve been wanting to tackle. His lab… Read More
  • Cancer

    Kevan Shokat At The Challenges in Chemical Biology Conference

    Kevan Shokat is now talking about his lab’s work on using Drosophila models for kinase inhibitor discovery in oncology. I always like hearing about this sort of thing; very small living models have a lot of appeal for drug discovery. You’d think that screening in fruit flies would be problematic for understanding human efficacy, but… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Udo Opperman At The Challenges in Chemical Biology Conference

    Now Udo Opperman is talking about histone modifications, which takes us into epigenetics. Whatever it is, epigenetics seems to be a big topic at this meeting – there are several talks and many posters addressing this area. His efforts at Oxford and the Structural Genomics Consortium are towards generating chemical tools for all the histone-mo… Read More
  • Cancer

    Stuart Schreiber at the Challenges in Chemical Biology Conference

    I’m listening to Stuart Schreiber make his case for diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS) as a way to interrogate biochemistry. I’ve written about this idea a number of times here, but I’m always glad to hear the pitch right from the source. Schreiber’s team has about 100,000 compounds from DOS now, all of which are searchable… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Forcing Fungi to Make Stranger Compounds

    Natural products come up around here fairly often, as sources of chemical diversity and inspiration. Here’s a paper that combines them with another topic (epigenetics) that’s been popular around here as well, even if there’s some disagreement about what the word means. A group of Japanese researchers were looking at the natural pr… Read More
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