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Posts tagged with "Chemical Biology"

  • Chemical Biology

    EMBL Chemical Biology: Greasy Labels

    Just to emphasize how careful you have to be with all these probes and labels, consider what I’m hearing now from Remigiusz Serwa of the Tate group at Imperial College. His group is looking at farnesylation. People have tried making azido-containing substrates, for later “click” fluorescent labeling of proteins that pick up the la… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    EMBL Chemical Biology: How Receptors Really Work

    The latest talk is from Alanna Schepartz of Yale. I had a chance to ride in from the airport with her yesterday, and she gave me a brief preview of her talk, which is on transport of both molecules and information through the plasma membrane of cells. “Some molecules weren’t paying attention when Lipinski’s rules… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    EMBL Chemical Biology: Unnatural Amino Acid Labels

    Now I’m listening to David Tirrell of Cal Tech, talking about his lab’s work on labeling proteins with azidohomoalanine (Aha) as a marker. He’s done a good job showing that (if you don’t go wild) that replacement of methionine with this amino acid doesn’t perturb things very much at all, and there’s a recent pape… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    EMBL Chemical Biology: Discovering Catalysts

    Right now, there’s a talk going on from Helma Wennemers of the ETH. She’s working on small peptidic catalysts for organic reactions, what one might think of as “mini-enzymes”. They’re certainly not as wildly effective as real enzymes, but they’re a lot easier to find and modify. Here’s an example, which has… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    EMBL Chemical Biology: Labeling Proteins

    Jason Chin of the MRC Molecular Biology lab in the UK has been talking here about protein labeling and genetic code expansion, an overview of the numerous papers his group has been publishing in this area over the last few years. And he’s just made what I think is a very worthwhile point. While talking… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    EMBL Chemical BIology: Natural Product Multiheterocycles

    Chris Walsh of Harvard is talking about the trithiazolylpeptide antibiotics and related compounds. If you thought that only we synthetic organic chemists were crazy enough to link three more heterocycles onto a central pyridine, leading to compounds which “have the solubility of sand” (a direct quote from Walsh), then think again. And t… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    EMBL Chemical Biology: Covalent Probes

    A short talk from Steven Verhelst of Munich went into detail on some covalent probes for rhomboid proteases. I’ve been interested for a while about what happens when you run small electrophilic compounds over proteins – do they stick to everything, or can they show selectivity? The canonical paper on this topic is from the… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    EMBL Chemical Biology: Weird Aggregating Compounds

    Now I’m listening to Jim Wells (UCSF) talk about (among other things) this work, where they found a compound aggregating and causing activity in their assays. But this one wasn’t doing the standard globular gunk that the usual aggregation gives you. Instead, the compound formed nanofibrils – microns long. And the enzyme that the c… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    EMBL Chemical Biology: Natural Product Leads

    I’m listening to Paul Hergenrother (of Illinois) talk about using natural products as starting materials for compound screening libraries. It’s a good idea – he takes readily available complex structures and does a range of organic chemistry on each of them, to make non-natural structures that have the complexity and functionality… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Four Billion Compounds At a Time

    This paper from GlaxoSmithKline uses a technology that I find very interesting, but it’s one that I still have many questions about. It’s applied in this case to ADAMTS-5, a metalloprotease enzyme, but I’m not going to talk about the target at all, but rather, the techniques used to screen it. The paper’s acronym for… Read More
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