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Posts tagged with "Chemical Biology"

  • Biological News

    A Close Look at Protein Head Counts

    So how many proteins are there in a living cell? Not how many different proteins, although that’s a pretty good question all by itself, one that’s been investigated pretty thoroughly. But how many actual protein molecules are there of each of those? This new paper is the latest attempt to answer that one, from the… Read More
  • Biological News

    The Landscape of Kinase Inhibitors

    I’ve been meaning to link to this article, which is the best overview I know of for kinase inhibitors. The authors (a large multicenter team led out of Munich) characterize 243 (!) kinase inhibitors that have made it into human trials across a very wide range of the known kinase enzymes, and the result is… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Catching Up With Protein Degradation

    Just a short note today – I know that a lot of readers in the Northeast will be snowed out of work today anyway, but there are plenty of others who aren’t! I wanted to mention this short review on targeted protein degradation in J. Med. Chem. (a subject I last wrote about here). It’s… Read More
  • Biological News

    CRISPR: The Latest Edition

    There’s a rather large breakthrough in CRISPR gene editing – yeah, another one – that has downstream implications for drug discovery. A group at the Salk Institute reports in Cell that they’ve found a way to do both loss- and gain-of-function without double-stranded DNA breaking. That’s quite different from the various… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    HAT Inhibitors: Interpret With Care

    There are quite a few histone deacetylase inhibitors out there, from research tools to FDA-approved drugs. Those inhibit the enzymes that remove the acetyl epigenetic markers from histone proteins – but what about inhibitors of the enzymes that put them on? Those are histone acetyltransferases (HATs), and they’ve naturally been the subj… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Poke Holes Through Your Membranes. It’s Fun.

    The cell membrane – the fundamental architecture of living things, the foundation of how our very bodies are organized – is a major pain in the behind. I express this ungrateful opinion merely because over the years it has rejected entry to some of my best ideas for drug candidates, and I bear a grudge. Read More
  • Cancer

    Watch Your Covalent Drugs Carefully

    EGFR is a growth-factor receptor protein that’s well known as a cancer target, and there are a number of drugs that target its kinase activity in order to shut it down. But as is also well known, many cancer cells are rather genomically unstable, and throw off mutations constantly. One of the most common problems… Read More
  • Cancer

    There Are Probes, And There Are Probes

    A friend in the business called my attention to this paper, which is about another piece of the ubiquitination system that I was writing about here just the other day – in this case, the deubiquitinating enzyme Rpn11. There are a couple of classes of deubiquitinators – some of them use a cysteine in their… Read More
  • Biological News

    The Blind Watchmaker’s Workshop

    Did it have to be this way? I mean all of it – biochemistry, the molecules of life. More specifically, as proteins evolve and change, how many paths could they have taken that would have taken them to the same sorts of function? That’s a pretty hard question to answer, since we’re looking at a… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Tagging Fungi For Destruction

    Fungal infections can be very bad news when they go beyond the get-something-from-the-drugstore stage. That fact that a drug as rough as amphotericin B is still in use is evidence enough of that. There’s definitely a need for new ideas in the antifungal area, but drug discovery there has been tough. This new paper, though… Read More
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