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Posts tagged with "Chemical News"

  • Chemical News

    Here’s What’s Been Done Before

    I enjoyed this ACS Med. Chem. Letters perspective on AI and machine learning in medicinal chemistry. It has several good points to make, and it brought up one that I haven’t gone into here before: if you’re mining the literature, you will get what the literature can tell you. At the very best, the high… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Small Molecule Structures: A New World

    Word has been spreading rapidly about this preprint on Chemrxiv.org, from a joint UCLA/Caltech team. It details the use of the cryo-electron microscopy technique called micro-electron diffraction (MicroED) for the structure determination of small molecules, and it’s absolutely startling. I read it last night, with many exclamations along the… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Blue Light Coming Out of the NMR

    I really enjoyed this paper from Merck’s Process R&D group, but some readers will be saying “Yeah, but that’s just because you really enjoy photochemistry reactions”. The latter part is true, but it’s the sort of paper that we need to help drain some of the voodoo out of all the exciting photochemistry work that… Read More
  • Cancer

    Replacing Antibodies With Small Molecules

    As anyone who’s been following the oncology field knows, antibodies against either the PD-1 receptor or its ligand PD-L1 are about the biggest things going in the field right now. Hundreds of clinical trials are underway against various tumor types and in various combinations, in the effort to see how far the immuno-oncology idea can… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Graphene: You Don’t Get What You Pay For

    Since I was going on yesterday about the need to validate tool reagents, I wanted to note that this problem is not confined to biochemical applications. Here’s an article looking at commercial sources of graphene, the carbon monolayer material that’s been the subject of so much research the last few years. There are a number… Read More
  • Chemical News

    CDK Inhibitors: Purchase With Caution

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDKs) have been drug targets for quite a while now. There are 20 different ones, and they help to regulate a whole list of important functions, particularly involving the cell cycle (which has made them of great interest in oncology research). There are three approved drugs in the area so far: Kisqali (ribociclib)… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Thoughts on the Chemistry Nobel Prize

    I wrote up this year’s Nobel Prize awards in chemistry yesterday, and there’s no arguing that they’re significant achievements worthy of a prize at this level. For many chemists, though, I think that this year’s award will join the 2015, 2012, 2009, 2008, 2006, 2004, 2003, 1997, and 1993 ones (and there are arguably even mo… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Dissolving One Way And Another

    All right, fellow chemists, you’ve got this hydrophobic/hydrophilic thing down, right? I’m glossing over the fact that our intuition about those things can be wrong, as can much of the software used to estimate it – we at least know about these concepts and have a physical picture of compounds that like to dissolve in… Read More
  • Chemical News

    The Enantioselective Ugi

    This is a remarkable result: a group from Shenzhen reports an enantioselective Ugi reaction. If you’re among the majority of the human race that doesn’t know what an Ugi reaction is to start with, it’s probably the best-known of a rather rare category, a four-component reaction. You take an aldehyde (ketones can work, too), an… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Simple Rings, Simply Wrong

    Medicinal chemists spend a lot of time thinking about the relative greasiness of their molecules. Being professional scientists, of course, we have come up with some slightly more quantitative phrases than “relative greasiness”, but that’s definitely the idea. How hydrophilic/hydrophobic a compound is determines not to what extent… Read More
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