Skip to Content

Posts tagged with "Chemical News"

  • Chemical News

    Retrosynthesis: Here It Comes

    Behold the rise of the machines. It’s been going on for a while, but there are landmarks along the way, and we may have just passed another one with the publication of this paper. It’s open-access,  from an interestingly mixed team: the Polish Academy of Science, Northwestern University, the University of Warsaw, the Ulsan Institute i… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Way Down There in the Pores

    Let’s get physical-organic. A big topic of research in recent years has been the properties of liquids and solids under boundary conditions. By that sweeping statement, I mean questions such as “When does a small cluster of metal atoms start to act like a small piece of bulk metal? Why is there a transition, and… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    PAINs by X-Ray

    It’s safe to say that the concept of “pan-assay interference compounds” evokes some strong feelings in medicinal chemists. And those feelings run in several directions: some people are very glad to have a tool with which to winnow down their screening hit lists (or at least to prioritize them), while others are infuriated by the… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Brute Force: Bring On the Machines!

    Well, here I was the other day going on about automated chemistry when this paper was waiting in my RSS feed. It’s from a group at Pfizer, and they’re using an automated microscale flow chemistry rig for reaction optimization. Inspired by this work from Merck, which demonstrated evaluation of 1536 reactions in a plate-based system… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Tickling Individual Bonds

    When you get down to it, most of the ways that we chemists have to make our reactions work are not very elegant. We can change solvents, mess with ligands, drip A into B slowly instead of B into A, etc. But we’re still depending on the molecules involved just running into each other. We… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Automated Chemistry: A Vision

    I enjoyed this article at Chemistry World, but fair warning: you may not. I say that based on the response when I’ve written about its subject here before, which is the automation of synthetic organic chemistry. There have been some pretty strong negative reactions to the idea, which fall into several categories. “You’re hyping s… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Down At the Small Surfaces

    Mechanochemistry – getting chemical reactions to occur by pressing, pulling, and grinding solid substances – continues to produce weird and interesting results. Here are a couple of recent ones from the same issue of Angewandte Chemie, both from a group at McGill. This paper is about making soluble compounds of the noble metals (such a… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Drug Synthesis In Printed Reactors

    I’m still trying to get my bearings with this new paper from the Cronin group at Glasgow. What it proposes is a new style of API (active pharmaceutical ingredient) production. Instead of being done in bench- or process-scale lab glassware or in production-plant reactors, these syntheses take place in 3D-printed reactors, connected together in… Read More
  • Biological News

    Mistreating Enzymes For a Good Cause

    What happens when you chuck an active enzyme into the wrong solvent? Well, it stops working (or at the very least, it stops working as well as it did). And how do you know which one is the wrong solvent? Why, those are the ones that make it stop working. That round trip is to… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Scaffold Popularity

    Here’s a paper that’s analyzing the popularity of different structural scaffolds in medicinal chemistry over time. The authors are using the ChEMBL database and looking for the core structures with the most work done on them, tracking changes over time (1998-2014). That’s a set of nearly 283,000 unique compounds to work with, but… Read More
...234...