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Posts tagged with "Chemical News"

  • Chemical News

    Automated Chemistry: A Vision

    I enjoyed this article at Chemistry World, but fair warning: you may not. I say that based on the response when I’ve written about its subject here before, which is the automation of synthetic organic chemistry. There have been some pretty strong negative reactions to the idea, which fall into several categories. “You’re hyping s… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Down At the Small Surfaces

    Mechanochemistry – getting chemical reactions to occur by pressing, pulling, and grinding solid substances – continues to produce weird and interesting results. Here are a couple of recent ones from the same issue of Angewandte Chemie, both from a group at McGill. This paper is about making soluble compounds of the noble metals (such a… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Drug Synthesis In Printed Reactors

    I’m still trying to get my bearings with this new paper from the Cronin group at Glasgow. What it proposes is a new style of API (active pharmaceutical ingredient) production. Instead of being done in bench- or process-scale lab glassware or in production-plant reactors, these syntheses take place in 3D-printed reactors, connected together in… Read More
  • Biological News

    Mistreating Enzymes For a Good Cause

    What happens when you chuck an active enzyme into the wrong solvent? Well, it stops working (or at the very least, it stops working as well as it did). And how do you know which one is the wrong solvent? Why, those are the ones that make it stop working. That round trip is to… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Scaffold Popularity

    Here’s a paper that’s analyzing the popularity of different structural scaffolds in medicinal chemistry over time. The authors are using the ChEMBL database and looking for the core structures with the most work done on them, tracking changes over time (1998-2014). That’s a set of nearly 283,000 unique compounds to work with, but… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Chirality, From Chemical Supply Houses to Life as We Know It

    I wrote here a few years ago about the Mysterious Sparteine Shortage, and it’s a problem that hasn’t gone away. Sparteine, for those who collect neither alkaloids nor asymmetric organic chemistry routes, is a naturally occurring compound (found in a South American species of lupine, among other places), and it’s also an interestin… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Extraction and Salting-Out

    I really enjoyed this paper, because it goes into detail on a technique that organic bench chemists the world over have all used at some point: “salting out”. I’ll go into some background for the nonchemists for a few paragraphs and then return to the paper itself, which all working organic chemists should have a… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Hydrothermal Vents Weren’t Home?

    It’s probably not surprising, but you would be hard pressed to find an area that’s full of more intractable arguments than origin-of-life studies. There are so many theories, because it’s relatively easy to add new ones, and it’s difficult to impossible to put many of them to the real test. Meanwhile, the scientific stakes a… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    How a Compound Dissolves – One Water Molecule At a Time

    Here’s another one of those nanoscale articles that gives me a bit of a shiver, because it shows pictures of something that I had assumed was beyond our ability to see. The authors, from the Ruhr University in Bochum, are looking at a simple organic molecule (an azobenzene, shown at right), adsorbed onto a solid… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Two Molecules, When You Were Expecting Just One

    Here’s a good short review on a subject that doesn’t come up too often in drug discovery, but can be a major headache when it does: atropisomerism. There are all sorts of structural isomers possible for organic compounds, and students in their second-year class have a joyful time learning them and keeping them straight. But… Read More
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