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Posts tagged with "Chemical News"

  • Chemical News

    The Old School

    I enjoyed this piece on “The Changing Culture of Chemistry”. The author, Bruce Gibb of Tulane, has in mind the changes that are apparent when you read old papers that describe (say) a couple of unidentified people associated with the project ingesting one of the sulfur-containing components of asparagus (asparagusic acid, newly isolated… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Song of Experience

    I noticed this paper when it came out, and filed it in my “Useful Lab Tricks” folder. Organic chemists who have used triphenylphosphine-driven reactions will want to do so, too. For the non-chemists in the crowd, triphenylphosphine (TPP) is a cheap, crystalline substance that is pretty easy to oxidize to triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO)… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Ron Breslow, 1931-2017

    It has not been a good week for the Columbia chemistry department, or for chemistry in general, come to think of it. Ron Breslow, who had been ill for some time, has just passed as well, following Gilbert Stork. Breslow was an unusual organic chemist, with interests in several different areas. He ranged from physical… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    A Rain of Tiny Droplets

    You might be surprised to know how little we chemists know about what our reactions are really doing. A case in point is the “on water” field. Water is generally not the greatest solvent for a lot of classic organic chemistry reactions, since the reactants, reagents, and products are often not very soluble (or are… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Gilbert Stork, 1921-2017

    Word reached me late yesterday that Gilbert Stork had died. His most recent paper was published just last month in Org. Lett., and included what will surely become a famous footnote in the chemical literature. 22. A plan for conversion of 33a to 1 was (with various deprotections/protections) C4-CH2OH to C4-CO2H, followed by Barton’s condition… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Darn Near Flatland

    Graphene is the most famous of the two-dimensional solids, and with good reason. We’ve all seen graphite in pencils, and it’s strange to think that this same substance, plus some household adhesive tape, led to a Nobel. (You probably wouldn’t want to try that experiment with actual pencils – the graphite is often blended wit… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    A Nobel for Cryo-EM

    The Chemistry Nobel committee seems to have taken everyone by surprise today with their award for cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). That’s not because it isn’t Nobel-worthy, though – it certainly is. But they tend to take their time before recognizing discoveries (ask 95-year-old John Goodenough, a key inventor of the lithium ba… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Building Our Own Molecular Machines

    Let’s talk about enzyme envy. That’s what we organic chemists experience when we stop to think about how every complex natural product in the world is synthesized so much more quickly and efficiently than we can do it. All those crazy multiple rings systems, those bizarre heterocycles, huge macrolides, and dense arrays of stereochemistr… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Short Chemistry Topics

    Blogging time is tight today, but there are several interesting stories and follow-ups that I wanted to mention. For starters, I wrote here about a cyclohexane analog that’s fluorinated all on one side of the molecule. That gives you very odd properties, and it and its relatives could be really useful solvents and additives, but… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Electrochemistry For All

    Phil Baran and co-workers Ming Yan and Yu Kawamata at Scripps have published an overview of what they feel is needed in synthetic organic electrochemistry, and I have to applaud them for it. The whole area has a lot of potential, but the current state of the field is messy. (Sorry for that sentence; I couldn’t… Read More
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