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Posts tagged with "Clinical Trials"

  • Biological News

    Gene Editing: Freely You Have Received, Freely Give

    This year has seen significant advances in the search for human gene editing of Mendelian disease. Back in April, a team from three major institutions in Seoul reported in Nature Biotechnology on the use of a recent CRISPR variation that does single-base-pair editing. Their proof-of-concept was the “Himalayan mutation“, an A-to-G switc… Read More
  • Cancer

    A Nobel for Immuno-Oncology

    As many had expected, the Nobel prize in medicine/physiology this year recognizes advances in immuno-oncology: James Allison (for CTLA4) and Tasuku Honjo (PD-1). For some years now, that has been a huge, massive, unstoppable wave in cancer research, and I would not want to try to estimate how much time, effort, and money has gone… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Fighting It Out Over Stem Cells

    This is going to sound weird, but remember stem cells? I know that they’re still an active and important area of research and all, but I’m referring more to the period of political enthusiasm about fifteen years ago. Elected officials at the gubernatorial and national level all had positions on stem cell research, and there… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    Reporting Clinical Trials

    In 2015, a study looked at drug-industry sponsored clinical trials versus those funded by the NIH, and concluded that about 20% of industry trials did not report results when required to do so, while the figure for NIH-sponsored research was about 50% (and even more for trials funded by other institutions). At the time, I… Read More
  • Cancer

    A Run of Contrary Results

    From the outside, medical progress looks a lot easier than it really is. Well, I realize that’s true of a lot of things, but it’s especially true in progress against disease, and that’s especially especially true (as I’ve said here before) when you’re talking about dietary influences and what can be learned from them.… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Digging Into the Genetics of Drug Targets

    Rare diseases – remember years ago, back when those were a case of market failure? When companies were reluctant to work on them because the market size was guaranteed to be small and you’d have to charge, like, a hundred thousand or more a year to make the whole idea financially viable? Which wasn’t going… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Sangamo’s Gene Therapy Results

    Let the arguing commence! That’s my response to the announcement this morning by Sangamo, a company that’s been trying to do gene therapy in the clinic. They’re not a CRISPR outfit, though – they’re using an alternate technique for gene silencing, using zinc finger regions instead. Even at that level, there’s mor… Read More
  • Cancer

    Real-Time Approval

    Here’s an example of the current regulatory framework – you may like it, you may not, but if you’re doing drug research you should know that it’s going on. The way it’s traditionally worked – for decades – has been that a company develops a drug, runs clinical trials, etc., puts together a (huge) data… Read More
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    Biogen and Eisai: Let the Alzheimer’s Arguing Commence

    Well, the tease is over: Biogen and Eisai have released data on their Alzheimer’s antibody, BAN2401. And the situation is messy, as many had feared. The top-line results are mostly positive, but there are several confounding factors that make them a matter of argument (see below). The companies were scheduled to go public with the… Read More
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    The Case of Verge Genomics

    A number of people have passed along the recent press stories about Verge Genomics, a new company out of YCombinator that has just raised $32 million for neuroscience drug discovery. Now that, as literally anyone who’s ever done it can tell you, is a hard field of a hard field, and I wish Verge good… Read More
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