Skip to Content

Posts tagged with "Drug Assays"

  • Chemical News

    CDK Inhibitors: Purchase With Caution

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDKs) have been drug targets for quite a while now. There are 20 different ones, and they help to regulate a whole list of important functions, particularly involving the cell cycle (which has made them of great interest in oncology research). There are three approved drugs in the area so far: Kisqali (ribociclib)… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Knowing the Structure

    There are a lot of topics that we really should know more about in drug discovery, but which are buried inside projects inside particular organizations. Some of this knowledge is available once you’re inside said organization, but some of it is hard to assemble even then (much less into a review from outside). An example… Read More
  • Biological News

    The Chemistry Nobels, 2018

    The 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has gone to Frances Arnold (for directed evolution of enzymes) and to George Smith and Gregory Winter for phage display. These are worthy discoveries, techniques that have gone on to be used for a huge variety of work ranging from blue-sky research to marketed drugs, and the Nobel committee… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    A New Antibiotic? Yes, Please

    New antibiotics against resistant Gram-negative bacteria make me happy, so I’m very glad to see this report from Genentech. They’ve been doing a lot of work on an antibiotic scaffold (arylomycins, Update: on a program that came in whey they bought RQx) which had not thus far really found much practical use, and it looks… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Virtual Compound Screening: The State of the Art

    Here’s an interesting article from a former colleague of mine, Pat Walters, on virtual chemical libraries. Those, of course, are meant to fill in the (large, enormous, humungous) gap between “compounds that we have on hand to screen” and “compounds that we could screen if we actually had them”. That second group, if ta… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Watching Protein Degradation Happen

    You know that a technique has attained wide currency when the vendors start selling reagents and tools around it. Here’s an example in the protein degradation field: a team at Promega (well-known vendors of assay reagents and kits) report a new system to evaluate the extent and time course of protein degradation compounds. For those… Read More
  • Biological News

    Cancer Cells Are Even Worse Than We Thought

    There are a lot of cancer cell lines out there, and many of them get used a lot, too. It’s not surprising, in a way, because these are cells that have already (and unfortunately) proven themselves to be robust and fast-growing, so many of these lines tend to take to cell culture conditions pretty well. Read More
  • Chemical News

    New Reactions And Where They’ll Come From

    Here’s a new paper calling for expanding the medicinal chemistry synthetic toolbox. There have been calls like this before, of course, but those weren’t wrong, either. It’s not hard to figure out how we’ve ended up where we are, though (links added to replace footnotes in the below paragraph): The limited set of reaction typ… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    In Situ Click Chemistry For Antibiotics

    I have always had a liking for the technique of having target proteins assemble their own inhibitors. This goes under several names: target-guided synthesis or protein-templated reactions more generally, and in situ click chemistry when the triazole/alkyne reaction is used as the assembly method. But the idea is the same in each case. You bring… Read More
  • Biological News

    GPCRs: Peeling The Onion Some More

    I like to say that when I was first working on G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) as drug targets, that after I while I thought I really understood a lot of what was going on. But that was the peak. Further experience eroded that confidence, and even though I’ve learned a lot more about them over… Read More
123...