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Posts tagged with "Drug Assays"

  • Drug Assays

    One Way to Find Out

    Here’s a thing about research (and drug discovery in particular) that makes it a bit different from many other occupations: you can go for extended periods without even being sure that you’re doing what you’re supposed to be doing. This thought came to mind yesterday when (on Twitter) Ash Jogalekar quoted a biotech veteran as… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Images of Machine Learning

    Where has machine learning made the most strides in recent years? A lot of people who are into this topic will tell you that it’s image processing, specifically recognition and differentiation of objects. You can see that just by how much more effective reverse imagine searching on the internet has become (to pick a free… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Digging Through the Proteins, Covalently

    I blogged here last year about some really interesting work from the Cravatt group at Scripps. It’s sort of an intersection between fragment-based screening and screening in cells, which is an intersection that I’d previously never thought existed. That’s because fragment screening typically involves biophysical methods (NMR, SPR… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Sorting Out Potential Antibiotics

    One of the tricky parts about trying to find new antibiotics is that many screening modes will just discover things that have been discovered before. You’d think that if you’re looking for “bug killers” that you could just run through the compound collection looking for stuff that, well, kills bugs, but the problem is that… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Calcium Probe Problems

    Fluorescent dyes and probes are wonderful things, and they have been absolutely crucial to our understanding of cellular biology. Being able to see specific protein types and cellular structures in real time through a microscope with dyes, being able to monitor things like calcium flux, oxidative stress, pH and so on through fluorescent probe molec… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    PAINs by X-Ray

    It’s safe to say that the concept of “pan-assay interference compounds” evokes some strong feelings in medicinal chemists. And those feelings run in several directions: some people are very glad to have a tool with which to winnow down their screening hit lists (or at least to prioritize them), while others are infuriated by the… Read More
  • Cardiovascular Disease

    Inhaled Nanoparticles – Good Ones, That Is

    Never give up on drug delivery ideas – that’s one of the big points I get out of this paper. The authors, part of a multi-center team from sites in Italy and Germany, have previously shown that calcium phosphate nanoparticles could be a good carrier for delicate cargo such as microRNAs. Such things tend to… Read More
  • Cancer

    A Hard Look At Liquid Biopsies

    This new paper has generated a lot of headlines (Science news writeup here). It reports work on the long-sought “liquid biopsy” idea for cancer screening, the use of circulating biomarkers to detect tumors via a blood test. The idea has obvious appeal, so much appeal that many news stories over the years have gotten well… Read More
  • Biological News

    The Landscape of Kinase Inhibitors

    I’ve been meaning to link to this article, which is the best overview I know of for kinase inhibitors. The authors (a large multicenter team led out of Munich) characterize 243 (!) kinase inhibitors that have made it into human trials across a very wide range of the known kinase enzymes, and the result is… Read More
  • Biological News

    Genetic Variation Gets More Real All the Time

    This study goes firmly into the file marked “You never could have done this one a few years ago, sonny”. We already know that there’s genetic variation in every population and in every individual. And we know that a large number of marketed drugs (about a third of them) target G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). But… Read More
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