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Posts tagged with "Drug Development"

  • Drug Development

    How to Be a Good Medicinal Chemist

    Longtime medicinal chemist Mark Murcko has a Perspective article out in J. Med. Chem. on “What Makes a Great Medicinal Chemist“. As he makes clear from the beginning, if you’ve been doing this stuff for a while, you’ve likely heard many of these recommendations before. But it’s useful for people starting out, and it… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Pharmacokinetic Advice From Genentech

    Here’s another solid pharmacokinetics paper, this one from Genentech, with advice on how to extend drug half-life (compare this other recent one). They’re specifically addressing the “make it less lipophilic” rule of thumb that many medicinal chemists have, and they demonstrate that this isn’t exactly a universal law.… Read More
  • Cancer

    Cancer Sequencing Hype And Reality

    This piece in Science says something that needs to be said louder and more publicly. If you live in the US, you’ve surely seen various cancer treatment centers talking about their personalized therapy plans, and especially how they’ll tailor things to your DNA sequence and so on. You would get the impression that we have… Read More
  • Drug Development

    BenevolentAI: Worth Two Billion?

    Regular readers will know that I have no problem believing that AI (in its various forms) will definitely have an impact on drug discovery. And regular readers will also know that I’m quite skeptical that it’s going to have an immediate impact on the high-level functions of drug discovery (what target to go after, what… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Pharmacokinetic Advice from Merck’s Collection

    Here’s a solid med-chem paper from Merck on the topic of extending half-life for small-molecule drugs. This obviously is most important (and can have the biggest effect) if your compound has a short half-life after dosing to begin with (and plenty of compounds do). As the paper notes, if you have constant clearance for the… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    One Way to Find Out

    Here’s a thing about research (and drug discovery in particular) that makes it a bit different from many other occupations: you can go for extended periods without even being sure that you’re doing what you’re supposed to be doing. This thought came to mind yesterday when (on Twitter) Ash Jogalekar quoted a biotech veteran as… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Drug Synthesis In Printed Reactors

    I’m still trying to get my bearings with this new paper from the Cronin group at Glasgow. What it proposes is a new style of API (active pharmaceutical ingredient) production. Instead of being done in bench- or process-scale lab glassware or in production-plant reactors, these syntheses take place in 3D-printed reactors, connected together in… Read More
  • Biological News

    The Landscape of Kinase Inhibitors

    I’ve been meaning to link to this article, which is the best overview I know of for kinase inhibitors. The authors (a large multicenter team led out of Munich) characterize 243 (!) kinase inhibitors that have made it into human trials across a very wide range of the known kinase enzymes, and the result is… Read More
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    Alzheimer’s and the Rare Disease Model

    Politico is a good source for national political stories, but I don’t usually look to them for coverage of drug development. But they’ve done a good job with their recent “Pharma Issue”. One of the stories (by David Freedman) is on the difficulties of Alzheimer’s drug discovery, which are legendary. The contrast betwe… Read More
  • Biological News

    Genetic Variation Gets More Real All the Time

    This study goes firmly into the file marked “You never could have done this one a few years ago, sonny”. We already know that there’s genetic variation in every population and in every individual. And we know that a large number of marketed drugs (about a third of them) target G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). But… Read More
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