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Posts tagged with "Drug Development"

  • Drug Development

    Drug Development Costs Revisited

    A recent paper on drug development costs did not impress me. But if possible, it impressed Matthew Herper at Forbes even less. That’s the one where the authors looked at a number of companies that had been around long enough to develop one drug – they figured that this would give a cleaner read on… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Whole Classes of Things

    We all know about target-based drug discovery. Enough biology has been learned that we think that Protein X is operating at a crucial stage in the development of Disease A, so we’re going to try to find an inhibitor/agonist/antagonist, a ligand/allosteric modulator/binder/potentiator, or something to somehow affect its actions. We’ve se… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Alnylam Breaks Through

    As a pioneer in RNAi therapeutics, Alnylam has really had some ups and downs over the years (some of them chronicled on this blog). Today would be one of the “up” moments, for sure. The company (in collaboration with Sanofi) has just announced positive Phase 3 data on their therapy for hereditary ATTR amyloidosis – Read More
  • Business and Markets

    It Costs More Than This

    Here’s another paper on the cost to develop a new drug, a topic about which, I’m convinced, debate will never end. This one is designed as a response to the Tufts estimates on these costs, and I’m not going to help much, because I have some things to debate about this paper myself. The authors… Read More
  • Cardiovascular Disease

    AMPK: Time To Think Hard

    AMP-activated protein kinase, now that’s an enzyme for you. It sits at the center of a cell’s metabolic switchboard, and if you’re talking about anything to do with the response to levels of fuel like glucose or fatty acids and determination of their downstream fates, then AMPK is almost certainly crucial. Activating the enzyme se… Read More
  • Drug Development

    How Long, Oh Lord, How Long?

    Here we have the prototypical slow summer day. So I’m going to use this one to throw a question out to the readership: those of you in preclinical drug discovery, what’s the longest you’ve personally worked on a project that eventually managed to deliver a clinical candidate? On the not-so-inspiring side, what’s the longest… Read More
  • Drug Development

    A Long Journey to the Capsid

    There’s a fine article at C&E News on Gilead’s capsid inhibitor for HIV. For those not into virology, the capsid is the protein coat that viruses have – it’s their armor, more or less, and disrupting its formation should be a large problem for them. But finding compounds that accomplish that is a large problem… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Phenotypic Screening: The State of the Art

    I can recommend this article on phenotypic drug discovery from the latest Nature Reviews Drug Discovery. (For the nonspecialists in the crowd, there are two broad categories of screening for drug leads. One is “target-directed”, where you have an idea from other studies about what protein or pathway you want to affect, and you set… Read More
  • Biological News

    Hemophilia: A Proving Ground For Genetic Disease

    There’s very good news for Alnylam (and their partner Sanofi) this morning. They’ve been working on an RNAi approach to hemophilia (fitusiran), targeting expression of antithrombin, a protein which as the name implies which keeps blood from clotting by several different mechanisms. The clinical data that have just come out look very en… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Following Up

    Here’s a question that I’m not sure if there’s a general answer to: if you’re putting together a drug discovery portfolio, what percentage of the projects should be new ones, and how many should be some form of follow-up? I say that there may not be a general answer because every place I’ve worked has… Read More
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