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Posts tagged with "Drug Development"

  • Biological News

    Hemophilia: A Proving Ground For Genetic Disease

    There’s very good news for Alnylam (and their partner Sanofi) this morning. They’ve been working on an RNAi approach to hemophilia (fitusiran), targeting expression of antithrombin, a protein which as the name implies which keeps blood from clotting by several different mechanisms. The clinical data that have just come out look very en… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Following Up

    Here’s a question that I’m not sure if there’s a general answer to: if you’re putting together a drug discovery portfolio, what percentage of the projects should be new ones, and how many should be some form of follow-up? I say that there may not be a general answer because every place I’ve worked has… Read More
  • Biological News

    Thinking About Genetics and Disease

    Robert Plenge has an excellent post here, drawing on this recent paper from authors at Stanford. It’s on the idea of polygenic traits and disease, a very worthwhile subject considering what’s going on in the drug industry these days. I say that because I’ve been making the joke, for some time now, that if you were… Read More
  • Cardiovascular Disease

    Thoughts on An Antibody Failure

    Talking with some drug discovery folks the other day, I said “You know, if you don’t hold your breath when your compound goes into tox testing, you haven’t been doing this stuff long enough”. Well, it’s pretty hard to hold your breath across a full tox study, but you know what I mean. There are… Read More
  • Drug Development

    Cutting (And Re-Cutting) the Research Pie

    Here’s something that goes on inside almost every biopharma research organization, but always happens behind the scenes if you’re not right there at the meetings: resource allocation for projects. That “almost” is in there because the smallest companies don’t have this problem in the same way, since they tend to have o… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Software Eats the World, But Biology Eats It

    I can strongly recommend this Bruce Booth post at LifeSciVC on computational models in drug discovery. He’s referencing Marc Andreessen’s famous “Why Software Is Eating the World” essay when he titles his “Four Decades of Hacking Biotech and Yet Biology Still Consumes Everything”. To tell you about where Bruce i… Read More
  • Cardiovascular Disease

    The Genomics Revolution Shows Up Late, But Shows Up

    Robert Plenge has an excellent overview of the PCSK9 story up on his site; I recommend it. His take may sound different from mine at first, but I think we’re actually in agreement on a lot of important points. I said that “PCSK9 is about as compelling a story as we’re likely to see in… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Aggregator Aggravation, In a New Way

    Experienced drug discovery folks, particularly those that work early on in the process, will tell you that aggregation is one of the most common sources of false positive “hits”. This happens when the molecule in question bunches up with others of its kind and makes a larger species, particles of something that has different properties… Read More
  • Cardiovascular Disease

    What PCSK9 Is Telling Us About Drug Discovery

    Friday’s news about the real-world effects of PCSK9 drugs continue to reverberate. It’s worth going into the topic again, but from a wider view of genomics-driven medicine, because this is currently one of the biggest strategies for drug discovery in the industry. The reasoning behind this is pretty compelling. If you comb through the h… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    The Good Sides and Bad Sides of Polar Compounds

    Yesterday’s mention of carbohydrates brings up another topic, one that was raised in the comments and in some email correspondence. Most drug companies with an internal screening collection are concerned, to some degree, about how greasy that collection has turned out to be. The concern comes from the general perception that the more hydropho… Read More
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