Skip to Content

Posts tagged with "Drug Development"

  • Drug Assays

    Aggregator Aggravation, In a New Way

    Experienced drug discovery folks, particularly those that work early on in the process, will tell you that aggregation is one of the most common sources of false positive “hits”. This happens when the molecule in question bunches up with others of its kind and makes a larger species, particles of something that has different properties… Read More
  • Cardiovascular Disease

    What PCSK9 Is Telling Us About Drug Discovery

    Friday’s news about the real-world effects of PCSK9 drugs continue to reverberate. It’s worth going into the topic again, but from a wider view of genomics-driven medicine, because this is currently one of the biggest strategies for drug discovery in the industry. The reasoning behind this is pretty compelling. If you comb through the h… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    The Good Sides and Bad Sides of Polar Compounds

    Yesterday’s mention of carbohydrates brings up another topic, one that was raised in the comments and in some email correspondence. Most drug companies with an internal screening collection are concerned, to some degree, about how greasy that collection has turned out to be. The concern comes from the general perception that the more hydropho… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Marathon’s Real Costs

    Endpoints has done a great breakdown on the actual costs that Marathon Pharmaceuticals is likely to have incurred while bringing their wildly overpriced old generic steroid to the US market. They did no new registrational studies in the clinic, in case you’re wondering. There was a drug-drug interaction study, ADME work, that sort of thing… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    A Call For Academic Drug Companies

    An editorial in Cell asks “How Much Longer Will We Put Up With $100,000 Cancer Drugs?” I’m of two minds on questions like that. OK, three minds. The immediate impulse, not an honorable one, is to respond with pure snark, which is always tempting, in the vein of “If you can keep your company going… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    The Hollywood Analogy

    Yesterday’s drug-research-is-hard screed brought a lot of responses, and I wanted to address some particular points that came up. On Twitter, Alex Tabarrok of Marginal Revolution advanced the Hollywood Analogy. I’ve used this one myself; it leads off a talk that I put together a few years ago. The model for a movie studio is… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    I Do Hate To Tell You This, But. . .

    The timing of this report from the FDA is surely no accident, but it’s always a good time to think about this: the great majority of all drugs that enter clinical trials fail. They fail because they don’t do anyone any good, or because what good they might do is outweighed by some serious and… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Curcumin Will Waste Your Time

    I really enjoyed reading this article in J. Med. Chem. on curcumin. (Update: here’s the take over at Practical Fragments). That’s a well-known natural product, found in large quantities in turmeric root (which is where most of the yellow color comes from). It has, over the years, been a hit in many, many assays, and… Read More
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    Vivek Ramaswamy’s Plans

    I last wrote about Vivek Ramaswamy in the context of his first company (Axovant). That one went public on the hopes for a retread Alzheimer’s drug to work out in Phase III, and if that sounds a little iffy to you, then join a fairly large club. Alzheimer’s is truly the approach-avoidance conflict writ large: from… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Not Fun Reading

    These numbers from Deloitte are not very reassuring. They do an annual survey of spending and returns on investment in the drug industry, and this year’s estimated return on R&D is down to 3.7%, which looks like the lowest yet. Back in 2009, another vast consulting house (McKinsey) estimated that returns were around 7.5% during… Read More
...456...