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Posts tagged with "Drug Industry History"

  • Drug Industry History

    Reading the Minds of Medicinal Chemists

    I suppose that all of us medicinal chemists should be flattered by this press release. According to it: Medicinal chemistry is among one of the most important and intellectually-challenging professions on the planet. It takes decades of training and experience to learn the properties of the thousands of molecules and their effects on the biological… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    A Grim Future? Here Are the Numbers.

    Here’s a bracing look at the state of the pharma business, especially regarding R&D costs and return on investment. And let me warn you – it’s not a feel-good sort of article, but the figures are hard to refute. The author, Kelvin Stott, comes out swinging: Here I apply a far simpler, much more robust… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    More Movements at the Top of GSK

    GlaxoSmithKline has been having more than its share of ups and downs over the last few years. In 2014, they moved a lot of assets out of oncology, as part of a general rearrangement into higher-volume lower-cost areas. That was a pretty bold move – give management credit for not being timid, at least – Read More
  • "Me Too" Drugs

    The Drug Project Landscape

    Here’s a new paper in Nature Reviews Drug Discovery that’s going to the trouble of matching specific disease indications with specific mechanisms in drug projects over the last 20 years (both the successful ones and the unsuccessful ones). The authors (from Vertex) used the Cortellis commercial database (with a good deal of filtering an… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Whole Classes of Things

    We all know about target-based drug discovery. Enough biology has been learned that we think that Protein X is operating at a crucial stage in the development of Disease A, so we’re going to try to find an inhibitor/agonist/antagonist, a ligand/allosteric modulator/binder/potentiator, or something to somehow affect its actions. We’ve se… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Alnylam Breaks Through

    As a pioneer in RNAi therapeutics, Alnylam has really had some ups and downs over the years (some of them chronicled on this blog). Today would be one of the “up” moments, for sure. The company (in collaboration with Sanofi) has just announced positive Phase 3 data on their therapy for hereditary ATTR amyloidosis – Read More
  • Drug Industry History

    Where MRSA Came From

    OK, everyone recognizes the problem that we face with drug-resistant bacteria. MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is the most well-known variety, and it’s bad news. Penicillin was introduced in the 1940s, and methicillin was brought to market in 1959, largely because so many infections were becoming resistant to penicillin by… Read More
  • Drug Development

    How Long, Oh Lord, How Long?

    Here we have the prototypical slow summer day. So I’m going to use this one to throw a question out to the readership: those of you in preclinical drug discovery, what’s the longest you’ve personally worked on a project that eventually managed to deliver a clinical candidate? On the not-so-inspiring side, what’s the longest… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    GSK Rearranges, Once More

    There have been a lot of announcements in the biopharma field this week, and I’m just now getting around to GlaxoSmithKline’s from a couple of days ago. The company announced that they’re dropping 30 R&D programs and refocusing the ones that are left. Cancer and immunology are now back in favor, and rare disease programs… Read More
  • Cancer

    The Keytruda Story

    This is a good history of Keytruda, the Merck immuno-oncology blockbuster, from David Shaywitz. Most big drugs have a tangled history, and this one is certainly not going to break tradition. As witness: It was discovered accidentally, by biotech scientists looking for drugs that would tamp down the immune response in patients with autoimmune diseas… Read More
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