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Posts tagged with "Infectious Diseases"

  • Business and Markets

    Anarchist Drugs For All. Yeahboy.

    I’ve had numerous requests for my opinion about this article, so here it comes: it’s largely bullshit. It’s about “a volunteer network of anarchists and hackers developing DIY medical technologies”, and I can see why Vice.com is running the article, because that drugs/anarchists/hackers combo is absolute catnip to thei… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Combination Screening, Scaled Up

    Here’s another one for the Brute Force File, always noting that brute repetitious force is what machines are here for. A joint MIT/Broad Institute effort reports on a platform for combinatorial drug screening in nanodroplets, in this case looking for known compounds that potentiate the effect of antibiotics on gram-negative bacteria. Testing… Read More
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    Alzheimer’s and Infectious Disease: For Real

    I’ve written a couple of times over the years about the idea that Alzheimer’s disease might have an infectious component to it. That’s been proposed many times, but it’s fair to say that it’s never caught on. For one thing, the amyloid hypothesis has always had a lot more going for it. I realize that… Read More
  • Infectious Diseases

    Fluoroquinolone Trouble Untangled

    The fluoroquinolone antibiotics are important drugs indeed – ciprofloxacin is probably the most famous of the bunch, but there’s a whole series of them, and they’re widely used for serious bacterial infections. (I last wrote about them here, with the various arguments about how they were developed in the first place). But for many… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Clicked DNA: From Lab Curiosity to Analytical Technique

    I’ve written a few times about an odd sort of unnatural DNA sequence, where some of the nucleotides are connected via “click” triazole units rather than the traditional polyphosphate backbone. I remember wondering what the chemical biology community would make out of these things, and I wanted to report on at least one ingenious a… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Sorting Out Potential Antibiotics

    One of the tricky parts about trying to find new antibiotics is that many screening modes will just discover things that have been discovered before. You’d think that if you’re looking for “bug killers” that you could just run through the compound collection looking for stuff that, well, kills bugs, but the problem is that… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Tetraphase and Their Troubles

    I wanted to provide an update of sorts to a piece from a few years back. This was the lawsuit brought by Mark Charest against Harvard et al. over royalties relating to Tetraphase, the antibiotics company founded by Andy Myers of their chemistry department out of his group’s synthetic work in the area. Charest believed… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Going After Ebola

    How small-molecule drugs fit into binding pockets in their targets is one of the central questions of medicinal chemistry. A new paper from a group at Oxford gives a good example of how varied that process can be – it’s looking at a number of drugs that have been shown to interfere (to some degree) with… Read More
  • Cancer

    Bacteria and Cancer: Another Connection

    Three months ago, I wrote about a report that some kinds of pancreatic cancer seem to be associated with particular infections, and wondered “How many similar stories are out there that we don’t know about yet?” Well, that didn’t take long to start being answered. This recent paper in Science (from a multicenter team: Dana- Read More
  • Drug Assays

    New Antibiotic Action

    I’m always happy to hear about new agents to treat gram-negative bacterial infections, especially after a stint working in antibiotic drug discovery myself. Seeing just how hard it is to kill these things did not improve my peace of mind about the problem of bacterial resistance, that’s for sure. So this paper caught my eye… Read More
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