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Posts tagged with "Infectious Diseases"

  • Infectious Diseases

    Vaccines Against a Vanishing Virus?

    Vaccines can be one of the most powerful and effective public health interventions, as experiences with smallpox and polio make clear. But vaccine development itself is quite difficult, which is why there are (relatively) few vaccines out there. Look at dengue, for example: it’s a longstanding viral problem in tropical areas, and would seem… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    A New Antibiotic? Yes, Please

    New antibiotics against resistant Gram-negative bacteria make me happy, so I’m very glad to see this report from Genentech. They’ve been doing a lot of work on an antibiotic scaffold (arylomycins, Update: on a program that came in whey they bought RQx) which had not thus far really found much practical use, and it looks… Read More
  • Biological News

    Switching On Innate Immunity

    Cells couldn’t have a hope of working if they weren’t tightly spatially organized. The nucleus vs. the cytosol (and the cell membrane itself) are the two most obvious partitions, and then you have specialized organelles like the mitochondria, et very much cetera, dividing things further. Life itself is organized around things being diff… Read More
  • Current Events

    Deliberate Vaccine Misinformation

    Over on my Twitter feed, which veers off-topic a bit more often than this blog, I had a series of tweets the other day about troll/bot accounts. And as fate would have it, that very subject now intersects more closely with a focus on biomedical news. This new paper in the American Journal of Public… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    In Situ Click Chemistry For Antibiotics

    I have always had a liking for the technique of having target proteins assemble their own inhibitors. This goes under several names: target-guided synthesis or protein-templated reactions more generally, and in situ click chemistry when the triazole/alkyne reaction is used as the assembly method. But the idea is the same in each case. You bring… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Anarchist Drugs For All. Yeahboy.

    I’ve had numerous requests for my opinion about this article, so here it comes: it’s largely bullshit. It’s about “a volunteer network of anarchists and hackers developing DIY medical technologies”, and I can see why Vice.com is running the article, because that drugs/anarchists/hackers combo is absolute catnip to thei… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Combination Screening, Scaled Up

    Here’s another one for the Brute Force File, always noting that brute repetitious force is what machines are here for. A joint MIT/Broad Institute effort reports on a platform for combinatorial drug screening in nanodroplets, in this case looking for known compounds that potentiate the effect of antibiotics on gram-negative bacteria. Testing… Read More
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    Alzheimer’s and Infectious Disease: For Real

    I’ve written a couple of times over the years about the idea that Alzheimer’s disease might have an infectious component to it. That’s been proposed many times, but it’s fair to say that it’s never caught on. For one thing, the amyloid hypothesis has always had a lot more going for it. I realize that… Read More
  • Infectious Diseases

    Fluoroquinolone Trouble Untangled

    The fluoroquinolone antibiotics are important drugs indeed – ciprofloxacin is probably the most famous of the bunch, but there’s a whole series of them, and they’re widely used for serious bacterial infections. (I last wrote about them here, with the various arguments about how they were developed in the first place). But for many… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Clicked DNA: From Lab Curiosity to Analytical Technique

    I’ve written a few times about an odd sort of unnatural DNA sequence, where some of the nucleotides are connected via “click” triazole units rather than the traditional polyphosphate backbone. I remember wondering what the chemical biology community would make out of these things, and I wanted to report on at least one ingenious a… Read More
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