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Posts tagged with "Infectious Diseases"

  • Analytical Chemistry

    Clicked DNA: From Lab Curiosity to Analytical Technique

    I’ve written a few times about an odd sort of unnatural DNA sequence, where some of the nucleotides are connected via “click” triazole units rather than the traditional polyphosphate backbone. I remember wondering what the chemical biology community would make out of these things, and I wanted to report on at least one ingenious a… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Sorting Out Potential Antibiotics

    One of the tricky parts about trying to find new antibiotics is that many screening modes will just discover things that have been discovered before. You’d think that if you’re looking for “bug killers” that you could just run through the compound collection looking for stuff that, well, kills bugs, but the problem is that… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Tetraphase and Their Troubles

    I wanted to provide an update of sorts to a piece from a few years back. This was the lawsuit brought by Mark Charest against Harvard et al. over royalties relating to Tetraphase, the antibiotics company founded by Andy Myers of their chemistry department out of his group’s synthetic work in the area. Charest believed… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Going After Ebola

    How small-molecule drugs fit into binding pockets in their targets is one of the central questions of medicinal chemistry. A new paper from a group at Oxford gives a good example of how varied that process can be – it’s looking at a number of drugs that have been shown to interfere (to some degree) with… Read More
  • Cancer

    Bacteria and Cancer: Another Connection

    Three months ago, I wrote about a report that some kinds of pancreatic cancer seem to be associated with particular infections, and wondered “How many similar stories are out there that we don’t know about yet?” Well, that didn’t take long to start being answered. This recent paper in Science (from a multicenter team: Dana- Read More
  • Drug Assays

    New Antibiotic Action

    I’m always happy to hear about new agents to treat gram-negative bacterial infections, especially after a stint working in antibiotic drug discovery myself. Seeing just how hard it is to kill these things did not improve my peace of mind about the problem of bacterial resistance, that’s for sure. So this paper caught my eye… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Not How You Speed the Process Up, Exactly

    Now, this truly does not sound like the way to run a clinical trial. Dr. William Halford of the Rational Vaccines company invited 20 patients to St. Kitts for a trial of a putative herpes vaccine. The consent forms explicitly stated that this was done to evade the jurisdiction of the US Food and Drug… Read More
  • Biological News

    Small Proteins: Into the Gap

    We medicinal chemists are used to thinking about small molecule drugs – it’s what we do. And we’re also comfortable with having a category in our worldview that we assign to “biologics” – proteins, mostly, many of them antibodies, which can also be extremely therapeutically effective under the right conditions. B… Read More
  • Cancer

    Bacteria Can Make Tumors Worse

    Since the topic of bacteria effects on human disease came up here just the other day, I wanted to point out a new article that comes at this idea from a different direction. This research got going when cells from pancreatic and colon tumor samples were co-cultured with human dermal fibroblasts. The cancer cell lines… Read More
  • Infectious Diseases

    Microbiome Connections to Disease Get Stronger

    A fair amount of what you read about the human microbiome is hype. There’s no way around it. It’s quite difficult to study this area in a meaningful, reproducible way, and even the best work in the area can only go so far, as things stand now. When differences in (say) gut flora are actually… Read More
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