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Posts tagged with "“Me Too” Drugs"

  • "Me Too" Drugs

    The Drug Project Landscape

    Here’s a new paper in Nature Reviews Drug Discovery that’s going to the trouble of matching specific disease indications with specific mechanisms in drug projects over the last 20 years (both the successful ones and the unsuccessful ones). The authors (from Vertex) used the Cortellis commercial database (with a good deal of filtering an… Read More
  • "Me Too" Drugs

    PARP Inhibitors Come Through

    PARP (poly ADP-ribose polymerase) inhibitors have had a rough time of it in the clinic. Sanofi had one (iniparib) fail, but it later turned out, embarrassingly, that it wasn’t really a PARP inhibitor at all (update: more on this here). AstraZeneca had a legitimate one fail as well (olaparib). Merck got out of the area… Read More
  • "Me Too" Drugs

    Isotope Labeling For Fun and Profit

    Here’s an article on a company called Molecular Isotope Technologies, and their bid to “revolutionize the drug industry”. From the name, you might expect that this is another deuterium-for-proton idea, and you would say to yourself “But that’s already been done”. But read on. The company is perhaps better known b… Read More
  • "Me Too" Drugs

    Novartis Impresses Where Others Have Failed

    There is some good news from the clinic today. Novartis reported data on LCZ696, a combination therapy for congestive heart failure, and the results have really grabbed a lot of attention. (The trial had been stopped early back in March, so the news was expected to be good). This is a combo of the angiotensin… Read More
  • "Me Too" Drugs

    The Hydrophobic Effect: I Don’t Understand It, Either

    We medicinal chemists talk a good game when it comes to the the hydrophobic effect. It’s the way that non-water-soluble molecules (or parts of molecules) like to associate with each other, right? Sure thing. And it works because of. . .well, van der Waals forces. Or displacement of water molecules from protein surfaces. Or entropic… Read More
  • "Me Too" Drugs

    Donald Light Responds on Drug Innovation and Costs

    Here’s a response from Prof. Light to my post the other day attacking his positions on drug research. I’ve taken it out of that comments thread to highlight it – he no longer has to wonder if I’ll let people here read what he has to say. I’ll have a response as well, but that’ll… Read More
  • "Me Too" Drugs

    Getting Drug Research Really, Really Wrong

    The British Medical Journal says that the “widely touted innovation crisis in pharmaceuticals is a myth”. The British Medical Journal is wrong. There, that’s about as direct as I can make it. But allow me to go into more detail, because that’s not the the only thing they’re wrong about. This is a new article… Read More
  • "Me Too" Drugs

    Translation Needed

    The “Opinionator” blog at the New York Times is trying here, but there’s something not quite right. David Bornstein, in fact, gets off on the wrong foot entirely with this opening: Consider two numbers: 800,000 and 21. The first is the number of medical research papers that were published in 2008. The second is the… Read More
  • "Me Too" Drugs

    Those Me-Too Drugs

    So, me-too drugs, knock-offs, copycats: what say you? If you’re a critic of the industry, you generally say quite a bit, and it’s about lack of innovation, seeking easy profits and playing it safe, putting marketing over science, and so on. But what if that’s not true? We’ve talked about this here before, but now… Read More
  • "Me Too" Drugs

    Biosimilars: Not So Dang Easy

    This post drew a lot of comments here about how the big companies are going after follow-on biologic drugs. As a late-2008 article put it: Merck already has one FOB in clinical development: a pegylated erythropoietin for anemia similar to Amgen’s Aranesp (darbapoetin alfa) called MK-2578, which is being developed using a sugar-modification te… Read More
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