Skip to Content

Posts tagged with "Pharmacokinetics"

  • Clinical Trials

    Silicon Stays in the Shadows

    I like this review, but I’ve seen it before. Well, not this exact manuscript, but every few years it seems there’s another one with a similar title, something about “Incorporating Silicon Into Drug Structures”. I am guilty of the exact same thing, though: here’s a blog post from 2004 on the topic, and here’s one… Read More
  • Pharmacokinetics

    There’s Toxicity, And There’s Toxicity

    This is a neat article at Bloomberg about the production of botulinum toxin (BTX, aka Botox). This is a drug that has some rather special handling involved: A baby-aspirin-size amount of powdered toxin is enough to make the global supply of Botox for a year. That little bit is derived from a larger primary source… Read More
  • Pharmacokinetics

    Fewer Flashy Drug Delivery Papers, Please

    Drug delivery – now that’s a tricky field. The variety of drug substances is large, and the ways that they’re taken up and distributed in living systems are many. And we’d like control over the process, which we don’t often have. A typical kid’s question is “How does the aspirin know where the headache is?… Read More
  • Cancer

    Watch Your Covalent Drugs Carefully

    EGFR is a growth-factor receptor protein that’s well known as a cancer target, and there are a number of drugs that target its kinase activity in order to shut it down. But as is also well known, many cancer cells are rather genomically unstable, and throw off mutations constantly. One of the most common problems… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Alnylam Breaks Through

    As a pioneer in RNAi therapeutics, Alnylam has really had some ups and downs over the years (some of them chronicled on this blog). Today would be one of the “up” moments, for sure. The company (in collaboration with Sanofi) has just announced positive Phase 3 data on their therapy for hereditary ATTR amyloidosis – Read More
  • Pharmacokinetics

    Adverse Events: A Look Under the Hood

    As most people know, there’s an FDA Adverse Event Reporting System, which is supposed to capture any sort of problems that turn up with approved drugs. Certainly if you have any kind of job in the industry, you know about it – every corporate training program includes a section about how if you hear about… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Ultrasound For Brain Drug Delivery – Not So Fast

    I wrote a couple of years ago here about the idea of making the blood-brain barrier more permeable by the use of focused ultrasound, in the presence of injected microbubbles. This would be a very useful thing if it works – as anyone who’s been concerned with central nervous system drugs (or drug delivery in… Read More
  • Cancer

    What We Can Do, Versus What We Could

    I remember reading Barry Sharpless’ big “click” chemistry paper in 2001, where he proposed the term for reactions that take place rapidly, selectively, and without any outside reagents, and proposed such techniques for the rapid assembly of diverse molecules. In the years since, the term has drifted away a bit at times to mean … Read More
  • Biological News

    Turmoil in Immuno-oncology

    Immuno-oncology! It’s such a big deal, let’s just do what everyone in the field is doing and call it “IO”. The recent successes in this area have rearranged every company’s oncology strategy, in some cases rearranging its entire oncology portfolio right out the door. There are several possibilities open to you now, if… Read More
  • Pharmacokinetics

    The First Deuterated Drug Arrives

    The first deuterated drug has finally been approved by the FDA. It’s Austedo (deutetrabenazine), from Teva, and it targets Huntington’s chorea. This is an interesting development on several levels. The idea of adding deuteriums (instead of plain hydrogens) to drug structures had been kicking around for many years, but only in the last 8… Read More
123...