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Posts tagged with "Regulatory Affairs"

  • Regulatory Affairs

    Kratom and the FDA

    The FDA has made an announcement about kratom, a plant preparation (Mitragyna speciosa) that (depending on who you ask) is a drug of abuse or a way for people to get off of other drugs of abuse. Specifically, it’s used as a way to mitigate opioid withdrawal symptoms, which is reason enough to wonder if it… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    A New Look at Clinical Success Rates

    Andrew Lo of MIT and his co-workers have published a really interesting paper on clinical trial probability-of-success numbers. It appears to be the largest such effort yet: In this article, we construct estimates of the POS and other related risk characteristics of clinical trials using 406 038 entries of industry- and non-industry-sponsored trial… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Hospitals Making Drugs?

    This story from the New York Times got a lot of attention yesterday, and understandably so. It’s fundamentally about the shortage of some generic drugs, a problem that’s been with us for some years now in one form or another. My own belief is that much of this is a regulatory problem, and I note… Read More
  • Biological News

    Genetic Variation Gets More Real All the Time

    This study goes firmly into the file marked “You never could have done this one a few years ago, sonny”. We already know that there’s genetic variation in every population and in every individual. And we know that a large number of marketed drugs (about a third of them) target G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). But… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Not How You Speed the Process Up, Exactly

    Now, this truly does not sound like the way to run a clinical trial. Dr. William Halford of the Rational Vaccines company invited 20 patients to St. Kitts for a trial of a putative herpes vaccine. The consent forms explicitly stated that this was done to evade the jurisdiction of the US Food and Drug… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    When Small Trials Convince

    This is a good piece by Bruce Booth in Forbes, and it points out something that’s changing in the biopharma landscape. Readers will have noticed over the years here the occasional eye-rolling at companies that run underpowered clinical trials and go to the FDA hoping for the best. That’s not a good place to save… Read More
  • Pharmacokinetics

    Fewer Flashy Drug Delivery Papers, Please

    Drug delivery – now that’s a tricky field. The variety of drug substances is large, and the ways that they’re taken up and distributed in living systems are many. And we’d like control over the process, which we don’t often have. A typical kid’s question is “How does the aspirin know where the headache is?… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Mongersen Fails

    Readers may recall a post here last year about an odd trial of an antisense drug for Crohn’s disease. Celgene had acquired the drug (mongersen, GED-301) from Nogra Pharma of Ireland back in 2014 as a late-stage candidate, and for a while, things looked good. In fact, going back and reading the stories, you’d think that… Read More
  • Cancer

    A Painful, Unacceptable Lack of Data

    Okay, this paper is not going to make a lot of people happy. The authors are reviewing oncology approvals by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) from 2009 to 2013 – overall, there were 48 drugs approved for 68 indications, which sounds like good news. 24 of the 68 were approved with survival benefit shown in… Read More
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    Bad News – But Not the Unexpected Kind

    Yesterday was not a good day for small companies trying to get drugs to regulatory approval for tough diseases. You may well remember Axovant, a company that I’ve written about several times (most recently here). To recap, AXON was started by a fund manager, who bought a failed Alzheimer’s candidate off GSK, announced that they’d… Read More
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