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Posts tagged with "The Central Nervous System"

  • Biological News

    Target Invalidation

    Target validation is a key process in drug discovery, naturally. But it’s worth remembering that target invalidation happens more often, and is also important. The first project I worked on in the drug industry proved pretty conclusively that selective antagonism at the D1 dopamine receptor is not an effective therapy for schizophrenia, des… Read More
  • Cancer

    Bromodomain Ligands and Memory

    Epigenetics has been a hot field the last few years (although not quite hot enough for Roche to buy out their partners in the area, Constellation). One of the things that’s driven a lot of bromodomain-focused research in the field has been the availability of a compound called JQ1, from the Bradner lab at Harvard. Read More
  • Drug Development

    A 3D Printed Drug?

    Several readers have sent along news of what’s billed as the “world’s first 3D-printed drug”. That got my attention, because there have been some rather wild predictions about the effects of that technology on drug discovery, some of them weird in the extreme. On checking this out, though, I found that it would be more accu… Read More
  • The Central Nervous System

    Sertraline in the Courts

    Potential trouble: thoughts of a link between cardiac birth defects and the antidepressant Zoloft (sertraline). Pfizer recently won such a case in Missouri, but the latest trial seems to have produced some internal documents that might lead to a different verdict. Since this is all in the context of lawsuits, the signal/noise (for an outside… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Four Patients. Count ‘Em, Four.

    While we’re on the subject of market froth, take a look at what’s going on today. Sage Therapeutics announced the results of a study in post-partum depression. (Note – these are not the same people as Sage Bionetworks out in Seattle; this is a small company in Cambridge). They used SAGE-547, a GABA-A allosteric modulator… Read More
  • The Central Nervous System

    The Brain Is Actually Connected to the Lymphatic System

    Here’s a surprise: there are lymphatic vessels going into the brain. That’s reported in this paper in Nature. (Here’s a pretty breathless press release from the University of Virginia, where the work was done). I’m no immunologist, but the work (done mostly in mice, and extended to human samples) looks pretty solid to me. We… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Some Side Effect For An Antibody

    Remember back when AstraZeneca was fighting off Pfizer’s ardent, tax-issue-resolving embrace a year ago? One of their weapons was a pitch to their own shareholders about what potential their own pipeline had, and how much of that would presumably go to waste should the deal go through. Even at the time, people thought that their… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    More on TC-2153

    Yesterday’s post on TC-2153 and its assay activity brought a note from Paul Lombroso at Yale, whose group is doing this work. With his permission, here’s an update (slightly edited): We have now used the drug orally in nonhuman primates with cognitive deficits: it had significant results. . .we have also given it to both… Read More
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    Sulfur, Sulfur, Sulfur

    Does anyone know of any phosphatase inhibitors that aren’t hideous? I ask this because someone sent along a question about this paper, from last August, that I’d missed at the time (press release here, but the paper’s open-access as well). Here’s a commentary in the journal itself. It’s work from Yale on an enzyme call… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Genervon and ALS: What’s Going On Here?

    Ever hear of Genervon, and their ALS therapy, GM604? There’s not too much to hear about, unless of course you’re a desperate patient or relative, looking for something, anything that might help. Genervon is certainly trying to reach those people, with press releases that include phrases such as “dramatic” and “very rob… Read More
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