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Posts tagged with "The Dark Side"

  • Business and Markets

    On Lies, and Liars

    ]\Today’s topic is “lies”. We will start with the cases of Elizabeth Holmes and Ramesh (“Sunny”) Balwani, of Theranos. As the world knows, Theranos was not what it was represented to be – John Carreyrou of the Wall Street Journal and his extraordinary demolition job on them showed that beyond doubt. But remember… Read More
  • Press Coverage

    Gotta Be a Conclusion In Here Somewhere

    A couple of years ago, I wrote about how far too much of human nutrition research was unfit to draw conclusions from. This new story does nothing to make a person more confident in the field: it’s a detailed look at the lab of Brian Wansink at Cornell, where he hold an endowed chair. He’s… Read More
  • The Dark Side

    Down the Rabbit Hole With Alireza Heidari

    Thanks to a comment on yesterday’s blog post, I was able to read this extraordinary tale, which comes to us courtesy of Prof. William Grover at UC Riverside’s Bioengineering department. Go check it out – you’ll learn of one Alireza Heidari, who is apparently quite the polymath. He is the author of 115 papers, which… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Inside Scientific Information?

    Here’s a question that came up in the comments the other day, after I wrote about the recent publication suggesting possible immune-response problems with the Cas9 protein used in CRISPR. That paper sent the stocks of the major companies in the area down about 10% (well, mostly, and only after people had a weekend to… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Incyte and Flexus: The Grappling Continues

    A couple of years back, I wrote about a case of accused stolen pharma intellectual property that looked like it would be heading to court. And here we are in 2017, and it’s. . .heading to court. The wheels of the law have been grinding along this whole time in the matter of Incyte and… Read More
  • The Dark Side

    The Ugly State of the Literature These Days

    So how’s it going out there in the land of the journals that will publish any flippin’ thing you send them? Apparently pretty well. I’m not sure if we’re still in the log phase of their growth or not, but there’s no shortage of quasi-open-access titles out there, the ones that (like reputable OA journals) Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Allergan Pulls A Fast One

    Friday brought news of a drug-company maneuver that I had never heard of, and didn’t even realize was possible. First, a bit of background; the stage needs to be set properly. One of Allergan’s products is Restasis, used for dry eyes, which is an opthalmic formulation of cyclosporine. It’s a valuable part of their portfolio… Read More
  • The Dark Side

    Thoughts on Reproducibility

    Not too long ago, I was talking to someone outside the field about the “reproducibility crisis”. They’d heard that there were many published papers whose results weren’t solid, and wanted to know if I’d encountered that. I had to tell them that yep, I sure had, and that just about anyone who’s worked in any… Read More
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    Neurotrope: A Shameful PR Stunt

    There was some Alzheimer’s news the other day, but it wasn’t actually about Alzheimer’s. Not very much. It was more about hype, press releases, and a grievous lack of understanding of statistics. Via @AndyBiotech and @biotechtoreador on Twitter, I came across this release about an announcement from a small company called Neurot… Read More
  • Cardiovascular Disease

    A Clinical Trial Torpedoed By Fraud and Incompetence

    Via @AndyBiotech on Twitter, here’s a story on some very troubling developments in offshore clinical trials. That Cardiobrief article is referring to this letter in NEJM, and the subject is the NIH’s trial of spironolactone in heart failure patients. The TOPCAT trial enrolled 3445 participants  in 6 countries (1151 in the US, 326 i… Read More
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