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Posts tagged with "The Scientific Literature"

  • The Dark Side

    Research Fraud, From A Master Fraud Artist

    A couple of years back, I wrote about the egregious research fraud case of Diederick Stapel. Here’s an extraordinary follow-up in the New York Times Magazine, which will give you the shivers. Here, try this part out: In one experiment conducted with undergraduates recruited from his class, Stapel asked subjects to rate their individual attrac… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    Towards Better Papers, With Real Results in Them

    This has to be a good thing. From the latest issue of Nature comes news of an initiative to generate more reproducible papers: From next month, Nature and the Nature research journals will introduce editorial measures to address the problem by improving the consistency and quality of reporting in life-sciences articles. To ease the interpretation… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    Scientific Posters, Heads on Platters, and Lawsuits

    Yep, these all tie together. Have a look at this post at Retraction Watch for the details. It’s about Colin Purrington, who has a web site on designing posters for conferences. I hadn’t seen it before, but it’s attained quite a bit of popularity (as it should; it seems to be full of sound advice). Read More
  • The Dark Side

    Fake Journals – But They’d Like Real Money

    I wish that this were an April Fool’s entry – and a number of scientists would like for that to have been the case, too. Nature reports that at least two journals (Archives des Sciences from Geneva and Wulfenia, a botany journal from Austria) have had their names hijacked by scam artists. Neither journal really… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    The Price of Publishing

    So, how much does it cost to publish a scientific paper, anyway? I’m not only talking about how much it costs you. That varies from journal to journal, and from type of journal to type of journal. One aspect of most open-access publishing models is that the author defrays editorial costs. (Which model is, of… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    Advertising in the Supplementary Information?

    Here’s a publication concern I’d never come across before. A reader sends word that an ACS journal asked him and his co-authors to remove the names of vendors and manufacturers in their Supporting Information, over concerns that this might be seen as some form of advertising. I think they were specifically thinking of whether the… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    Scientists and Google Reader’s Demise

    I suspect that many people follow this blog through its RSS feed. And I feel sure that many readers here follow the current scientific literature that way. Journals are updated constantly, and that’s the most concentrated way to get all the new information in one place for flipping through. (No more “new journal table” in… Read More
  • The Dark Side

    Anonymity, Fakery, et al.

    I wanted to link to this piece at C&E News on the whole question of anonymity when it comes to comments on the chemical literature. This was brought on by the advent of Blog Syn, but it applied before that, and will continue to apply to other situations. Its author, Fredrik von Kieseritzky, also calls… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    Open Access For ACS Articles?

    Rich Apodaca investigates something that I didn’t know, either: that the ACS provides the corresponding authors of papers with links to their articles, which (1) allow for fifty free downloads during the first year after publication, and (2) allow for unlimited free downloads after that. I thought about that for a while, and couldn’t re… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Phil Baran at Blog Syn

    I linked recently to the latest reaction check at Blog Syn, benzylic oxidation by IBX. Now Prof. Baran (a co-author on the original paper, from his Nicoloau days) has written See Arr Oh with a detailed repeat of the experiment. He gets it to work, so I think it’s fair to say that (1) the… Read More
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