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Posts tagged with "The Scientific Literature"

  • The Dark Side

    Thoughts on Reproducibility

    Not too long ago, I was talking to someone outside the field about the “reproducibility crisis”. They’d heard that there were many published papers whose results weren’t solid, and wanted to know if I’d encountered that. I had to tell them that yep, I sure had, and that just about anyone who’s worked in any… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Ignoring the Literature, Selectively

    Very little time for blogging today (travel), but I wanted to pass on some words of wisdom from Kevan Shokat, from a recent Perspectives piece in Nature Reviews Cancer. Talking about chemical probes, and how to know if they’re valid enough to work with, he suggests that you need to see dose-response data (for one… Read More
  • Cancer

    How to Know When a New Target is Really a New Target

    This is an excellent article, and the title is self-recommending: “Common Pitfalls in Preclinical Cancer Target Validation”. The abstract speaketh the truth: An alarming number of papers from laboratories nominating new cancer drug targets contain findings that cannot be reproduced by others or are simply not robust enough to justify dr… Read More
  • Cardiovascular Disease

    A Clinical Trial Torpedoed By Fraud and Incompetence

    Via @AndyBiotech on Twitter, here’s a story on some very troubling developments in offshore clinical trials. That Cardiobrief article is referring to this letter in NEJM, and the subject is the NIH’s trial of spironolactone in heart failure patients. The TOPCAT trial enrolled 3445 participants  in 6 countries (1151 in the US, 326 i… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    A Publication Dilemma

    Here’s a tricky situation that a reader of the blog has run into. To their dismay, a paper has just appeared in an open-access journal that seems to duplicate much of his group’s research. He says that they had a good deal of material available via presentations on their own web site, and worries that… Read More
  • The Dark Side

    The Predatory Beat Goes On

    I’m not the least bit surprised by this effort. The predatory junk journals will do what ever they can think of to bring in customers and cash, with no restrictions and no shame: . . .we created a profile of a fictitious scientist named Anna O. Szust and applied on her behalf to the editorial… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    Read, And Read the Odd Stuff

    This article gets across a truth that many people have heard as a piece of advice, but find hard to follow: read the scientific literature widely. Perhaps the bigger question is why I make the effort. The short answer is that I read widely to prepare myself for whatever might come along in the lab. Read More
  • Drug Assays

    The ACS Journals Tighten Up Screening Standards

    Here’s an article (free access) in ACS Central Science on assay interference compounds, a contentious topic that has been aired here (and in many other places). This one, though, is authored by the editors-in-chief of all the relevant ACS journals and is appearing in all of them as well. People will argue about some of… Read More
  • The Dark Side

    The Predatory Publishers List Goes Dark

    I’ve been meaning to write about the sudden demise of Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers. I’ve referred to it several times over the years in posts about the lower (much lower) end of the scientific publishing world, and used it many times as a resource. To recap, while there are many reputable open-access publishers in… Read More
  • Biological News

    A First Look at Reproducibility in Cancer Biology

    I’ve been waiting for these results: the Reproducibility Project (Cancer Biology) has been going back over several prominent papers in the field, seeing how well their results hold up. This follows a similar effort in experimental psychology, where the results were mixed. The hopes here were to reproduce 50 high-profile studies, but as this N… Read More
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