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Posts tagged with "The Scientific Literature"

  • The Dark Side

    The Predatory Beat Goes On

    I’m not the least bit surprised by this effort. The predatory junk journals will do what ever they can think of to bring in customers and cash, with no restrictions and no shame: . . .we created a profile of a fictitious scientist named Anna O. Szust and applied on her behalf to the editorial… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    Read, And Read the Odd Stuff

    This article gets across a truth that many people have heard as a piece of advice, but find hard to follow: read the scientific literature widely. Perhaps the bigger question is why I make the effort. The short answer is that I read widely to prepare myself for whatever might come along in the lab. Read More
  • Drug Assays

    The ACS Journals Tighten Up Screening Standards

    Here’s an article (free access) in ACS Central Science on assay interference compounds, a contentious topic that has been aired here (and in many other places). This one, though, is authored by the editors-in-chief of all the relevant ACS journals and is appearing in all of them as well. People will argue about some of… Read More
  • The Dark Side

    The Predatory Publishers List Goes Dark

    I’ve been meaning to write about the sudden demise of Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers. I’ve referred to it several times over the years in posts about the lower (much lower) end of the scientific publishing world, and used it many times as a resource. To recap, while there are many reputable open-access publishers in… Read More
  • Biological News

    A First Look at Reproducibility in Cancer Biology

    I’ve been waiting for these results: the Reproducibility Project (Cancer Biology) has been going back over several prominent papers in the field, seeing how well their results hold up. This follows a similar effort in experimental psychology, where the results were mixed. The hopes here were to reproduce 50 high-profile studies, but as this N… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Curcumin Will Waste Your Time

    I really enjoyed reading this article in J. Med. Chem. on curcumin. (Update: here’s the take over at Practical Fragments). That’s a well-known natural product, found in large quantities in turmeric root (which is where most of the yellow color comes from). It has, over the years, been a hit in many, many assays, and… Read More
  • In Silico

    Watson and Pfizer

    I have wondered several times around here about how (and if) IBM’s Watson platform is going to be able to help out with drug discovery, and it looks like we may be able to find that out. Pfizer has signed up with IBM to use the Watson technology in its immuno-oncology research. Here we go: Watson… Read More
  • The Dark Side

    A Field Guide to Authorship Fraud

    Here’s a good overview at Nautilus of the various sorts of authorship fraud that takes place with scientific publications. The authors, Adam Marcus of Gastroenterology & Endoscopy News and Ivan Oransky of Retraction Watch, are focusing especially on the schemes that invent authors, co-authors, reviewers and so on, with many useful exampl… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Wholesale Clinical Data Fabrication

    Here’s a disturbing analysis of a long series of clinical trials conducted by Yoshihiro Sato and co-workers in Japan. As described in this article at Stat, Sato’s research (focusing on drug effects on hip fracture)  has been coming under question for some time now. He published results on 33 (!) clinical trials between 1997 and… Read More
  • The Dark Side

    Dupeless Needication

    Here are two papers have been going around on Twitter for a few days now. The first one is from a Hindawi title, “The Scientific World Journal”, from a group at the University of Malaya. And the second is from the same team (several overlapping co-authors), published a year or so later in Scientific Reports. Neither… Read More
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