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Posts tagged with "Toxicology"

  • Life in the Drug Labs

    Pyridine Doesn’t Do What You Think It Does

    OK, this is not exactly a time-sensitive issue, but since I took a crack at one of the most prominent toxicology myths in the biology labs (ethidium bromide is not really all that bad, in case you missed it), I figured I should do the same for one of the persistent myths on the organic… Read More
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    A New Way to Make GSK3 Inhibitors

    Of the discovery of GSK3 (glycogen synthase kinase 3) inhibitors there has been no end. I first came across it as a target it about 1997, and even then, once I started reading the literature, I quickly felt as if I were late to the party. It’s been investigated for diabetes (and other metabolic diseases), Alzheimer’s… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Antibiotics Are Hard, Continued

    I wrote here about an ingenious synthetic effort into structurally diverse ketolide antibiotics, structures that need a lot of work to make them from the ground up. Well, I have one of those good-news/bad-news reports: it looks like synthetic work will definitely be needed in this area, because the latest clinical candidate in it has… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    A Quiet And Sudden Exit for Amiselimod

    Here’s an example of a common behavior in this industry – and to be fair, in many others as well. Big deals are celebrated and press-released at the outset, but if things don’t work out, they end very quietly – as quietly as possible. Sometimes that’s not very possible at all, because a big Phase… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Revusiran’s Failure Revisited

    I wrote about Alnylam’s recent clinical disaster here, where they had to stop a Phase III siRNA therapy trial against a rare amyloidosis with cardiac complications. A reader sends along the link to this 2008 paper that suggests a possible reason for the excess deaths seen in the trial. The authors studied a range of different siRNA… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Alnylam Blindsided

    Alnylam, the big name in RNAi therapeutics, had an awful day of it yesterday, and is having another one today. More may be on the way. Rivusiran, their Phase III candidate for transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR), has been abruptly pulled from trials. This is particularly out of the blue, since the company had just completed enrollment… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Cathepsin K: A Promising Target Fades Out

    Here’s another one for the file of huge, long, costly drug discovery efforts that came to nothing (and that no one outside the business ever hears about): cathepsin K inhibitors. I remember “Cat K” from my own (relatively brief) days in osteoporosis drug work some years ago. It’s a target that’s been around since the… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Valeant Sure Picks the Winners

    You may remember brodulamab, the anti-IL-17-receptor antibody (update: fixed a mistake in the mechanism) that was under development by Amgen and AstraZeneca for psoriasis (among other indications). But it was abandoned last year when the clinical trials showed “suicidal ideation” turning up. But those canny market-driven Valeant folks p… Read More
  • Cancer

    Glyphosate And Cancer

    Glyphosate (often known by its original brand name, Roundup) is the most widely used agricultural chemical in the world. What, if anything, is it doing to people? I bring this up because of some recent (and seemingly contradictory) news items. A group of farmers is suing Monsanto, the compound’s original developers, because they claim that… Read More
  • Cancer

    Nanoparticles Mix It Up With Reality

    Nanoparticles (well, papers about nanoparticles) have been impossible to avoid for. . .what, ten years now, would you say? There’s so much potential there in so many fields, and there are so many things to try, that the literature is a gigantic pile that gets more deliveries dumped on it every week. And how many… Read More
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