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Posts tagged with "Toxicology"

  • Animal Testing

    Organ Models on Chips

    Why do we test new drug candidates on animals? The simple answer is that there’s nothing else like an animal. There are clearly chemical and biological features of living systems that we don’t yet understand, or even realize exist – the discovery of things like siRNAs is enough proof of that. So you’re not going… Read More
  • The Central Nervous System

    Sertraline in the Courts

    Potential trouble: thoughts of a link between cardiac birth defects and the antidepressant Zoloft (sertraline). Pfizer recently won such a case in Missouri, but the latest trial seems to have produced some internal documents that might lead to a different verdict. Since this is all in the context of lawsuits, the signal/noise (for an outside… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Some Side Effect For An Antibody

    Remember back when AstraZeneca was fighting off Pfizer’s ardent, tax-issue-resolving embrace a year ago? One of their weapons was a pitch to their own shareholders about what potential their own pipeline had, and how much of that would presumably go to waste should the deal go through. Even at the time, people thought that their… Read More
  • Infectious Diseases

    Trouble with Sovaldi, Or Not?

    I wish that this were some sort of April Fool’s entry, but it isn’t. There appears to be an outside chance that Gilead’s huge-selling Sovaldi (sofosbuvir) for hepatitis C has some cardiovascular problems. There have been a few reports from the field, and the FDA has asked for a label change when the drug is… Read More
  • Biological News

    A New Cell Assay -And What It Says About Stapled Peptides

    I’m always looking out for new assays that might tell us what the heck is going on inside cells, so this paper caught my eye. The authors describe a new luciferase-based complementation assay for detecting protein-protein interactions. There are several things like this in the literature already (and for sale, too), but this one has… Read More
  • Animal Testing

    Whatever Happened to the Fish and the Frogs?

    Eight or ten years ago, there was a good deal of excitement about non-mammalian small animal model systems for compound screening – specifically fish and frogs. More specifically, zebrafish and Xenopus. A number of small companies started up to do this sort of thing, and large companies paid attention as well. A correspondent, though, wrote… Read More
  • The Dark Side

    Deadly Incompetence in India

    Here, then, is the bottom of the drug-manufacturing barrel: the recent case in India where women at a sterilization clinic were poisoned by defective ciprofloxacin tablets. They were supposed to be getting 500mg of the antibiotic, but after several deaths, analysis has shown there there was perhaps 300mg of the actual drug present, and some… Read More
  • Cancer

    Bind’s Attempts To Remake Chemotherapy

    There’s a lot of effort (and a lot of money) going into targeted nanoparticle drug delivery. And that’s completely understandable, because the way we dose things now, with any luck, will eventually come to seem primitive. So you used to just have people eat the compound, did you, or just poke it into their bloodstream… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    We Can’t Calculate Our Way Out of This One

    Clinical trial failure rates are killing us in this industry. I don’t think there’s much disagreement on that – between the drugs that just didn’t work (wrong target, wrong idea) and the ones that turn out to have unexpected safety problems, we incinerate a lot of money. An earlier, cheaper read on either of those… Read More
  • Drug Development

    A Question: Monoclonal Antibodies in the Clinic

    A reader sends along this query, and since I’ve never worked around monoclonal antibodies, I thought I’d ask the crowd: how much of a read on safety do you get with a mAb in Phase I? How much Phase I work would one feel necessary to feel safe going on to Phase II, from a… Read More
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