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Posts tagged with "Toxicology"

  • Biological News

    A New Cell Assay -And What It Says About Stapled Peptides

    I’m always looking out for new assays that might tell us what the heck is going on inside cells, so this paper caught my eye. The authors describe a new luciferase-based complementation assay for detecting protein-protein interactions. There are several things like this in the literature already (and for sale, too), but this one has… Read More
  • Animal Testing

    Whatever Happened to the Fish and the Frogs?

    Eight or ten years ago, there was a good deal of excitement about non-mammalian small animal model systems for compound screening – specifically fish and frogs. More specifically, zebrafish and Xenopus. A number of small companies started up to do this sort of thing, and large companies paid attention as well. A correspondent, though, wrote… Read More
  • The Dark Side

    Deadly Incompetence in India

    Here, then, is the bottom of the drug-manufacturing barrel: the recent case in India where women at a sterilization clinic were poisoned by defective ciprofloxacin tablets. They were supposed to be getting 500mg of the antibiotic, but after several deaths, analysis has shown there there was perhaps 300mg of the actual drug present, and some… Read More
  • Cancer

    Bind’s Attempts To Remake Chemotherapy

    There’s a lot of effort (and a lot of money) going into targeted nanoparticle drug delivery. And that’s completely understandable, because the way we dose things now, with any luck, will eventually come to seem primitive. So you used to just have people eat the compound, did you, or just poke it into their bloodstream… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    We Can’t Calculate Our Way Out of This One

    Clinical trial failure rates are killing us in this industry. I don’t think there’s much disagreement on that – between the drugs that just didn’t work (wrong target, wrong idea) and the ones that turn out to have unexpected safety problems, we incinerate a lot of money. An earlier, cheaper read on either of those… Read More
  • Drug Development

    A Question: Monoclonal Antibodies in the Clinic

    A reader sends along this query, and since I’ve never worked around monoclonal antibodies, I thought I’d ask the crowd: how much of a read on safety do you get with a mAb in Phase I? How much Phase I work would one feel necessary to feel safe going on to Phase II, from a… Read More
  • Drug Development

    Why Not Bromine?

    So here’s a question for the medicinal chemists: how come we don’t like bromoaromatics so much? I know I don’t, but I have trouble putting my finger on just why. I know that there’s a ligand efficiency argument to be made against them – all that weight, for one atom – but there are times… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Thalidomide, Bound to Its Target

    There’s a new report in the literature on the mechanism of thalidomide, so I thought I’d spend some time talking about the compound. Just mentioning the name to anyone familiar with its history is enough to bring on a shiver. The compound, administered as a sedative/morning sickness remedy to pregnant women in the 1950s and… Read More
  • General Scientific News

    All Natural And Chemical Free

    Yesterday’s link to the comprehensive list of chemical-free products led to some smiles, but also to some accusations of preaching to the choir, both on my part and on the part of the paper’s authors. A manuscript mentioned in the blog section of Nature Chemistry is certainly going to be noticed mostly by chemists, naturally… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    The Virtual Clinical Trial: Not Quite Around the Corner

    Here’s one of those “Drug Discovery of. . .the. . .Future-ure-ure-ure” articles in the popular press. (I need a reverb chamber to make that work property). At The Atlantic, they’re talking with “medical futurists” and coming up with this: The idea is to combine big data and computer simulations—the kind an engi… Read More
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