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Posts tagged with "Uncategorized"

  • Cancer

    Spreading Cancer (Or Just Waking It Up)

    If you look at any collection of “common myths about cancer”, you will probably find reassurances about the idea that having cancer surgery might cause the cancer to spread to other parts of the body. I remember coming across this one some years ago being surprised – I’d never heard that one myself, but it… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    Predation

    “Beall’s List”, as a way to keep track of predatory publishers, has been officially offline for some time now. Jeffrey Beall himself has said that it was taken down under “intense pressure” from his employer (the University of Colorado at Denver), although his employer says no, not at all, this was his personal decisio… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Single Atoms, On Demand

    We chemists spend a lot of time doing things in the solution phase. It makes sense – if you want things to react, getting all the partners dissolved in some medium where they can roam around and contact each other is surely the way to go, most of the time. But it’s also true that… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Retrosynthesis: Here It Comes

    Behold the rise of the machines. It’s been going on for a while, but there are landmarks along the way, and we may have just passed another one with the publication of this paper. It’s open-access,  from an interestingly mixed team: the Polish Academy of Science, Northwestern University, the University of Warsaw, the Ulsan Institute i… Read More
  • Condensates: A New Organizing Principle in Cells?

    I wrote a couple of years ago about the idea of “condensates” inside cells – liquid-like droplets of proteins and other biomolecules that associate together in high concentration. That’s an odd idea for most all of us, because we’re used to thinking about cell compartments being membrane-enclosed and cellular anatomy b… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Way Down There in the Pores

    Let’s get physical-organic. A big topic of research in recent years has been the properties of liquids and solids under boundary conditions. By that sweeping statement, I mean questions such as “When does a small cluster of metal atoms start to act like a small piece of bulk metal? Why is there a transition, and… Read More
  • The Dark Side

    Down the Rabbit Hole With Alireza Heidari

    Thanks to a comment on yesterday’s blog post, I was able to read this extraordinary tale, which comes to us courtesy of Prof. William Grover at UC Riverside’s Bioengineering department. Go check it out – you’ll learn of one Alireza Heidari, who is apparently quite the polymath. He is the author of 115 papers, which… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    PAINs by X-Ray

    It’s safe to say that the concept of “pan-assay interference compounds” evokes some strong feelings in medicinal chemists. And those feelings run in several directions: some people are very glad to have a tool with which to winnow down their screening hit lists (or at least to prioritize them), while others are infuriated by the… Read More
  • Press Coverage

    Where Does the News Hype Come From?

    From Chris Chambers on Twitter (of Cardiff Univ.) come some very important points about press coverage of scientific results. I often make references here to misleading and inaccurate headlines and stories in the popular press – as a scientist, it’s hard to take, seeing research results mangled in the only venues that most people will… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Tickling Individual Bonds

    When you get down to it, most of the ways that we chemists have to make our reactions work are not very elegant. We can change solvents, mess with ligands, drip A into B slowly instead of B into A, etc. But we’re still depending on the molecules involved just running into each other. We… Read More
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