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Posts tagged with "Uncategorized"

  • Analytical Chemistry

    The Entropic Term is Laughing At Us

    There are plenty of things to optimize in a med-chem project other than binding affinity. But if you don’t have at least some level of binding, you may not have a med-chem project. And while from the outside, you might think that understanding how and why compound A binds to a given target while compound… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Complex Organics Are Out There – Again

    There’s no way, as a chemist and telescope owner, that I could let this story go by. A new paper reports mass spec data from ice grains that have been sprayed from Saturn’s moon Enceladeus, and let’s just say that there’s a lot of stuff in them. Enceladeus and Europa (a broadly similar moon around… Read More
  • Chemical News

    A Catalytic Dess-Martin?

    I have not tried this new reaction out, but it could be a real convenience, in several ways, for synthetic organic chemists. The authors, from Texas A&M, had previously reported an air-driven catalytic route to iodine (III) oxidants, and now they extend that work all the way up to iodine (V). The key is generation… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Relay Calculates Its Way Through

    Bloomberg has a feature on Relay Therapeutics, who are just a few blocks away from me (and where several former colleagues of mine work). It’s a nice writeup, and also features a (relatively rare) spotlight on David Shaw of D. E. Shaw research. He’s one of those guys that you’ve likely never heard of unless… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Organic Chemistry on Mars

    We’re going far afield for chemistry news this morning: all the way to Mars. As many readers will have seen, there’s some very interesting (and long-awaited) news – deposits of organic compounds have been conclusively identified. (Here’s the paper, free full text). This really is of great importance, for several reasons, and… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Birch Reactions Without the Ammonia

    The Birch reduction – there’s an old-school synthetic transformation from you. I thought that when I first did one in 1983, so it must be even more so now, right? You condense liquid ammonia and dissolve a reactive metal in it (sodium or lithium are the usual), giving you a rather unexpected blue solution. That… Read More
  • Infectious Diseases

    Fluoroquinolone Trouble Untangled

    The fluoroquinolone antibiotics are important drugs indeed – ciprofloxacin is probably the most famous of the bunch, but there’s a whole series of them, and they’re widely used for serious bacterial infections. (I last wrote about them here, with the various arguments about how they were developed in the first place). But for many… Read More
  • Drug Development

    How to Be a Good Medicinal Chemist

    Longtime medicinal chemist Mark Murcko has a Perspective article out in J. Med. Chem. on “What Makes a Great Medicinal Chemist“. As he makes clear from the beginning, if you’ve been doing this stuff for a while, you’ve likely heard many of these recommendations before. But it’s useful for people starting out, and it… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Hydrogenating in a Ball Mill

    Here’s one to add to the “weird mechanosynthesis” pile. According to this paper, you can do hydrogenation reactions in a stainless-steel ball mill, without any sort of noble-metal catalyst. The hydrogen is produced when you add some n-alkane or diethyl ether to the mix (these actually get converted to gaseous methane and hydrogen… Read More
  • Cancer

    Spreading Cancer (Or Just Waking It Up)

    If you look at any collection of “common myths about cancer”, you will probably find reassurances about the idea that having cancer surgery might cause the cancer to spread to other parts of the body. I remember coming across this one some years ago being surprised – I’d never heard that one myself, but it… Read More
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