Skip to Content
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Calcium Probe Problems

    Fluorescent dyes and probes are wonderful things, and they have been absolutely crucial to our understanding of cellular biology. Being able to see specific protein types and cellular structures in real time through a microscope with dyes, being able to monitor things like calcium flux, oxidative stress, pH and so on through fluorescent probe molec… Read More
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    More Rough Alzheimer’s News

    Man, Alzheimer’s. That’s my reaction to yesterday’s news in the field. Merck started things off with news of their last-ditch attempt to see if their beta-secretase (BACE) inhibitor verubecestat (MK-8931) could be useful. I’ve been writing about that one for a while – here’s 2012, when they announced that the com… Read More
  • Current Events

    Pfizer’s Cutbacks

    Update: it appears that these are actually the previously announced Neuroscience cutbacks taking effect – some reports I’d received made it sound as if this were something new. I’ve changed the title of the post to reflect this. I’ve heard from more than one source that Pfizer is making fairly broad cuts in research staffing… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Pay Your Money and Hold Your Breath

    In another example of the white-knuckle here-we-go nature of the drug business, Bristol-Myers Squibb announced this morning that they’re doing a huge deal with Nektar Therapeutics for their immune stimulant drug candidate, NKTR-214. Well, actually, they’re not getting the drug, because the development deal is non-exclusive. And theyR… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    PAINs by X-Ray

    It’s safe to say that the concept of “pan-assay interference compounds” evokes some strong feelings in medicinal chemists. And those feelings run in several directions: some people are very glad to have a tool with which to winnow down their screening hit lists (or at least to prioritize them), while others are infuriated by the… Read More
  • The Central Nervous System

    Understanding Antidepressants – Or Not

    I was talking with a colleague the other day who’s done a lot of work on central nervous system disease over the years, and it reminded me of something that I said years ago on this blog (and was the first time I was quoted in the Wall Street Journal). Was that an opinion about… Read More
  • Cancer

    The Next Immuno-oncology Frontier?

    Here’s some strong evidence for what could be the next wave of immuno-oncology: combining a TLR9 ligand with an OX40 antibody. We’re all going to have to get familiar with that sort of talk, so here’s what’s going on: As those who have worked in inflammation or infectious disease know well, the TLRs (Toll-like receptors) Read More
  • Regulatory Affairs

    Kratom and the FDA

    The FDA has made an announcement about kratom, a plant preparation (Mitragyna speciosa) that (depending on who you ask) is a drug of abuse or a way for people to get off of other drugs of abuse. Specifically, it’s used as a way to mitigate opioid withdrawal symptoms, which is reason enough to wonder if it… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    Competing Interests

    The Nature publishing group recently changed its rules on author disclosure for things that might affect objectivity in the authorship of papers. The criteria include the usual ones regarding financial interests, employment, funding, and so on. There’s a new section on non-financial stuff, though: Non-financial competing interests can take di… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Bristol-Myers Squibb Sows Confusion

    Yesterday was a weird day for Bristol-Myers Squibb. The company announced the results of a highly anticipated clinical trial, one combining Opdivo (nivolumab) and Yervoy (ipilimumab) in lung cancer patients. As those who follow this area know, BMS has been losing ground to Merck for the last year or two, as Merck’s Keytruda (pembrolizumab) ma… Read More
...456...