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Dealing with Age as an Older Job-Hunter

A Wall Street Journal reader wrote to Toddi Gutner, one of the newspaper’s careers advisers, about a question uppermost in the minds of job-hunters over the age of 40: How do you deal with your age in interviews and resumes? The reader said, in his question published today, that he received conflicting advice from people he trusted.

While most Science Careers’ readers are early-career scientists, this is not a far-fetched issue for some of our readers. Among our Facebook fans, for example, 6% are age 45 or older. Our  Science Careers story last week about the career of Patricia Alireza, who earned a Ph.D. in physics at the age of 45 after raising a family, got a few “thumbs up” on our Facebook page.

In one respect, the current tough job market may give older job-hunters an advantage. “This is a good time to position yourself as a deeply competent and confident professional in your area of expertise and experience,” Rabia de Lande Long, a consultant and executive coach told Gutner. “In uncertain economic times, employers can be drawn more to experienced workers who join with ready-to-use skills and a shallow learning curve.”

One specific question the reader asked was whether to include the dates of college degrees on your resume, since they enable hiring managers can calculate your age. Gutner says that in most cases it’s a good idea to include the dates. If you don’t, it suggests that you have something to hide, which would raise even more questions among H.R. departments and hiring managers. Plus, employers frequently verify dates of previous employment and educational attainment, so there is little reason to hide the dates on your resume.

If you are in your mid-50s and older, be prepared for more resistance among hiring managers. But there are ways to deal with it. A flattering photo on your LinkedIn profile may dispel some doubts. But more importantly, says career coach de Lande Long, you want to use your cover letter to differentiate yourself from the common perception of older candidates, “by showing results, (understanding of) technology and demonstrate
ease in interacting with colleagues of all ages,” she says.

Another professional advises older job-seekers to avoid the ‘been there, done that’ attitude. Instead, show interest,
commitment, enthusiasm and energy. “If you’re bored with your
profession, you can be sure that comes through in an interview,” says
Susan Chadick, a principal at Chadick Ellig, an executive-search firm
serving small and mid-size companies and startups.