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Posts tagged with "Book"

  • Assembling the Dinosaur: Fossil Hunters, Tycoons, and the Making of a Spectacle
    Lukas Rieppel

    Book

    A new history reveals how the wealthy elite helped shape modern natural history museums in America

    The first 6 months of 1905 saw two prominent, celebrity-studded, and copiously publicized unveilings of full-size dinosaur exhibits. In February, the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in New York unveiled its Brontosaurus mount; in April, Andrew Carnegie’s donation of a cast of Diplodocus carnegii (his “namesake,” as he liked to call it) was presented… Read More
  • How We Teach Science: What's Changed and Why It Matters
    John L. Rudolph

    Book

    Past efforts to reshape American science education offer lessons for future reformers

    Compared with reading, writing, and arithmetic, science is a relative newcomer to the primary and secondary school curriculum, emerging only in the late 19th century. Nevertheless, proponents of the subject have established it as central to what an educated person needs to know, not least because of the promise of good jobs in scientific fields. Read More
  • The Spectacle of Illusion: Deception, Magic and the Paranormal
    Matthew L. Tompkins

    Book

    Magic and mysticism reveal cognitive shortcuts with implications beyond entertainment

    Published to coincide with the Wellcome Collection’s exhibition “Smoke and Mirrors: The Psychology of Magic,” The Spectacle of Illusion is a delightful and informative roller coaster that explores our fascination with magic, the paranormal, and the psychology of cognitive illusions. Author Matt Tompkins—who is both a psychologist and a magician—makes a detailed analysis of magicians… Read More
  • Slime: How Algae Created Us, Plague Us, and Just Might Save Us
    Ruth Kassinger

    Book

    Slime

    Ruth Kassinger’s Slime illustrates the important role algae have played in the world over time and begins with the story of cyanobacteria, describing how these prokaryotic organisms shaped early life on Earth by producing an oxygenated atmosphere. To the present day, cyanobacteria symbiotically living in the aquatic fern Azolla still play important roles for organic… Read More
  • Because Internet: Understanding the New Rules of Language
    Gretchen McCulloch

    Book

    Because Internet

    In her new book, Because Internet, Gretchen McCulloch divides inhabitants of the internet into five groups, arguing that “[y]our experience of the internet and the language therein is shaped by who you were and who else was around at the time you joined.” “Old Internet People” came online when the internet first started and tend… Read More
  • Archaeology from Space: How the Future Shapes Our Past
    Sarah Parcak

    Book

    Archaeology from Space

    Ten years after the publication of her first scholarly tome dedicated to the relatively new field of “space archaeology” (1), Sarah Parcak leaves behind the matter-of-fact tone of textbooks to offer readers a more personal view on satellite remote sensing and how it has come to take its place in the archaeologist’s toolbelt. Her new… Read More
  • Digital Cash: The Unknown History of the Anarchists, Utopians, and Technologists Who Built Cryptocurrency
    Finn Brunton

    Book

    Digital Cash

    Things change so fast with digital money that by the time an academic monograph emerges on the subject, some of its ideas may have already lost currency. Rather than try and predict the future, Finn Brunton’s Digital Cash is a “history of the present,” presenting contemporary innovations in electronic money and cryptocurrency through an archaeology of digital… Read More
  • The Fate of Food: What We’ll Eat in a Bigger, Hotter, Smarter World
    Amanda Little

    Book

    The Fate of Food

    Imagine you have just eaten the best burger of your life, covered with creamy avocado, crisp lettuce, and a ripe tomato, and nestled between a hearty bun. Now, what if that burger did not come from a cow but was cultivated by using stem cells? What if the avocado spread was crafted by a 3D… Read More
  • Fall; or, Dodge in Hell
    Neal Stephenson

    Book

    Fall

    In his latest novel, Fall, Neal Stephenson tells the story of Richard Forthrast, better known as “Dodge,” a video game magnate who has willed his brain to research in the hopes of being reanimated. Heeding the call of the “Eutropians,” Dodge and seven others lead the charge for digital immortality, foretelling the emergence of new… Read More
  • Moonbound: Apollo 11 and the Dream of Spaceflight
    Jonathan Fetter-Vorm

    Book

    Moonbound

    As you bury your feet in the sand this summer, imagine tucking your toes into something a little more exciting: lunar regolith. This July marks the 50th anniversary of the first human Moon landing, an event recently feted at box offices and on bookshelves. Jonathan Fetter-Vorm’s nonfiction graphic novel Moonbound: Apollo 11 and the Dream… Read More
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