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Posts tagged with "Biological News"

  • Biological News

    After Such Knowledge

    So now we know more about the CRISPR human baby story. And it’s even worse than it looked. Let me recommend this report from Sharon Begley at Stat, from the International Human Genome Summit in Hong Kong, but it’s not going to make you happy to read it. It turns out that He Jiankui devoted quite… Read More
  • Biological News

    Born CRISPRed. Now What?

    Are there CRISPR-modified human babies now or not? I was waiting to write about this story in hope that it might get a little more clear, but so far that doesn’t seem to be happening. So here we go. What we know so far is that He Jiankui, a researcher from Shenzhen’s Southern University of Science… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Disorder and Order

    An interesting feature of many proteins is a disordered region down at the carboxy end. The reason for this feature has been obscure: if there’s part of the protein that just spends its days flailing around uselessly, why go to the trouble of translating it? Many of these tails certainly seem to have no defined structural… Read More
  • Biological News

    Engineering Biology, For Real?

    Any article titled “How to Engineer Biology” is going to get a look from me – and when I’m referenced in the opening paragraphs, especially so. This is a piece by Vijay Pande in Scientific American, and I get called out for my naming of the “Andy Grove Fallacy” (found in this post and the… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    That One Serotonin Receptor

    Serotonin is perhaps the only neurotransmitter molecule that you could find named in a random poll, thanks to its association with antidepressants. (That association is far messier than popular opinion realizes, but that’s another topic). It’s a complicated one to have embraced, that’s for sure. There are 13 subtypes of GPCR serot… Read More
  • Biological News

    Real Progress in Parkinson’s

    There have been some potentially significant developments in Parkinson’s disease, which is a good thing to be able to report. As populations age around the world, PD has been on its way up, but therapies for it have not been, despite a good deal of work in the field. But it looks like some clues… Read More
  • Biological News

    Rewiring Bacteria

    Earth is basically a bacteria planet, despite humankind’s naked-eye-level profile. They’ve been here unfathomably longer than we have, they live in plenty of places where we can’t survive, and their biomass far outranks ours. This paper will show you just how adaptable the little creatures are. Wild-type E. coli (like many other… Read More
  • Biological News

    Sunlight And the Brain

    One of the impressive things about biochemistry and cell biology is how it can produce physical correlates to things that we know and experience, but have no detailed explanation for. There’s a really interesting example out in Cell that has to do with the effects of sunlight on mood and learning. Those effects are real, but… Read More
  • Biological News

    Gene Editing: Freely You Have Received, Freely Give

    This year has seen significant advances in the search for human gene editing of Mendelian disease. Back in April, a team from three major institutions in Seoul reported in Nature Biotechnology on the use of a recent CRISPR variation that does single-base-pair editing. Their proof-of-concept was the “Himalayan mutation“, an A-to-G switc… Read More
  • Biological News

    Soluble Proteins – And Those Other Ones

    Modifying proteins with unnatural amino acids is a wide field with a lot of interesting research areas. Nature has provided us with twenty-odd amino acids (counting some rare ones), but there’s no reason that we have to play the hand that we’re dealt. Modifications of protein transcription and translation machinery have increasingly all… Read More
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