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Posts tagged with "Cancer"

  • Cancer

    Bacteria and Colon Cancer

    Let’s catch on some non-coronavirus research today with an interesting approach against a very bad disease, metastatic colon cancer. This new paper (from groups at Virginia Tech and Wake Forest) adds to our understanding of something that’s been noticed for some time: colon cancer tissue is often infected with Fusobacterium nucleatum. T… Read More
  • Cancer

    Vitamin C and Immuno-oncology

    Linus Pauling was a fearsomely great scientist who is remembered by the general public for his advocacy of megadoses of Vitamin C, a favorite topic of his later in life. Infectious disease, cancer: Pauling advised gram amounts of ascorbic acid and had a lot of theorizing to offer about why that was beneficial. So while… Read More
  • Cancer

    Cancer By the Numbers

    I mentioned cancer incidence versus cancer mortality the other day, and I wanted to highlight this NEJM paper, which is a recent and comprehensive look at the topic. You can see several different effects in the data. Hodgkin’s lymphoma, for example, has shown a pretty steady incidence rate over the past 40 years, but steadily… Read More
  • Cancer

    Big News in Cancer, Versus Big Talk About It

    We have two very different stories about the progress of cancer therapy this morning. We’ll start with the good part: the American Cancer Society says that death rates from the disease in the US dropped in the 2016-2017 period by their largest recorded percentage. This is unequivocally good news, and is attributed to advances in… Read More
  • Cancer

    Evading Chemotherapy, Bacteria-Style

    One of the key advantages bacteria have (versus our strategies to outwit them) is their fast turnover. Bacterial generations come along so quickly that advantageous mutations can spread through a population much faster than we can deal with the changes. And it gets worse: there are many bacterial species that actually increase their mutation rates… Read More
  • Biological News

    Resisting Protein Degradation: The Cells Fight Back

    With all the work going into targeted protein degradation now (recent review), we’re discovering a lot of things about it that weren’t apparent at first. To pick an obvious one, these things have several steps in their mechanism (binding to the target protein, binding to a ubiquitin ligase to form a ternary complex, ubiquitination of… Read More
  • Biological News

    The 2019 Medicine Nobel

    So we have the first prize of the 2019 Nobel season, Medicine/Physiology for William Kaelin Jr. (Dana-Farber), Peter Ratcliffe (Oxford), and Gregg Semenza (Johns Hopkins), for their work in cellular adaptation to oxygen levels. This was not one of the outcomes that was in the top of the betting range, but it sure wasn’t in the… Read More
  • Biological News

    N-Acetyl Cysteine: A Warning Shot

    I’ve highlighted several articles here over the years that cast doubt (to say the least) on the popular belief that Antioxidants Are Always Good For You. These other views do not seem to have penetrated the public consciousness yet, though, to judge by the way that foods and supplements are advertised. Today brings another example… Read More
  • Cancer

    Your Cancer Targets May Not Be Real

    I wrote here about a paper from Cold Spring Harbor labs that invalidated MELK as a cancer target. That was straightforward enough: knocking it out via CRISPR across a whole range of cancer cell lines had no effect on their growth at all, so it’s kind of hard to make the case that it’s an… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    The Last of Stemcentrx

    The final implosion of the Stemcentrx deal is worth a note, although I said a lot of what I have to say about it back in December. I want to especially emphasize two points I made back then – first, that the failure of this whole acquisition is different only in degree, and not in… Read More
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