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Posts tagged with "Chemical Biology"

  • Chemical Biology

    Linked-Up Molecules Through the Years

    We’re seeing a lot of bivalent molecules in drug discovery these days, especially with the popularity of bifunctional protein degrader ligands. The general structure of such thing is (ligand)—-linker—-(ligand), with the two ligands chosen (in the case of targeted protein degradation) to bring a ubiquitin ligase complex up close to… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Tiny Proteins

    Here’s another for the “things we just didn’t realize” file. This article is a nice look at “miniproteins” (also known as micropeptides), small but extremely important species that we’ve mostly missed out on due to both our equipment and our own biases in looking at the data. Other recent overviews are here… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    More on Covalent Compounds, And Covalent Fragments

    At a previous company some years back, I was interested in getting a “covalent fragment” collection going, and did to a small extent. It got screened against some antibacterial targets, but never became all that popular. That was partly because fragment-based screening was a younger field, and combining it with covalent drug discovery … Read More
  • Biological News

    Resisting Protein Degradation: The Cells Fight Back

    With all the work going into targeted protein degradation now (recent review), we’re discovering a lot of things about it that weren’t apparent at first. To pick an obvious one, these things have several steps in their mechanism (binding to the target protein, binding to a ubiquitin ligase to form a ternary complex, ubiquitination of… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    A New Way to Make Azides

    I wanted to mention this paper that’s out in Nature, especially since I was mentioning azide/alkyne click chemistry the other day. If you’re using that system in any sort of chemical diversity sense, you’ve run into problems on the azide end. There are not a whole lot of commercially available azides out there (although definitely… Read More
  • Biological News

    Enter GlycoRNAs

    Layer upon layer! That’s what cell biology provides you with – just when you think you understand some area of it, things turn out to be more complex. I’m going on in this mode after looking over this new preprint from the Bertozzi lab at Stanford, which uncovers a new class of biomolecules that no… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Probes For Everything

    In case you don’t know, there’s officially an effort to try to develop chemical probes for basically every protein in the human proteome. The “Target 2035” initiative has been looking through the literature and finding what you’d expect: power-law distributions that have most people working on proteins that other peopl… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    A Completely New Way to Picture DNA in Cells

    Just how are things organized in a living cell? What’s next to what, in three dimensions? That is, of course, a really hard question to answer, but we’re going to have to be able to answer it in a lot of contexts (and at high resolution) if we’re ever going to understand what’s going on… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Myristoylation Probes, Rethought

    The need for good chemical probes continues, and (sadly) so does the use of crappy ones. That’s what I took away from this recent paper from a multicenter team out of London. They’re looking at commonly used probes for inhibition of N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) enzymes, and it’s one of those good-news/bad-news situations. N-myrist… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    A Small-Molecule CRISPR Inhibitor

    The number of stories and journal articles about how CRISPR DNA-editing technology works, has worked, and is planned to work are beyond counting. How about an article about how to stop it in its tracks? That’s this one, just published in Cell from a multicenter team in Cambridge and New York. It describes a screening… Read More
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