Skip to main content
Menu

Posts tagged with "Chemical News"

  • Chemical News

    Perverse Polymorphism

    I mentioned polymorphs the other day, and no mention of those should go by without a reference to the classic 1995 article on “disappearing polymorphs” and its 2015 follow-up. This is a controversial area, but what everyone can agree on is that there are numerous cases where some particular crystal form of a compound has… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Another New Form of Carbon – It’s A Weird One

    Here’s a surprise: a report of a completely new (and rather unusual) allotrope of carbon. There doesn’t appear to be a manuscript out there yet, but the results were presented earlier this month at a conference in Richmond and earlier this year at the APS meeting, and caused a stir. Weirdly, this one appears to… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Linked-Up Molecules Through the Years

    We’re seeing a lot of bivalent molecules in drug discovery these days, especially with the popularity of bifunctional protein degrader ligands. The general structure of such thing is (ligand)—-linker—-(ligand), with the two ligands chosen (in the case of targeted protein degradation) to bring a ubiquitin ligase complex up close to… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Droplets, Then Crystals

    If you’re a chemist, then you like crystallization. I think that’s pretty much a given; I’ve never met anyone who doesn’t appreciate a good crystal, and watching them form out of a solution never stops feeling a bit like magic. When I was doing a project involving metal-organic frameworks, I had some of the best… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Enhanced Diffusion: Real or Illusion?

    Let’s think for a minute about what’s going on with tiny particles in solution, because we chemists spend an awful lot of time dealing with those. These particles vary in size from individual atoms all the way through small molecules, larger biomolecules and polymers, nanoscale engineered particles, micronized powders, etc., but the goo… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Chiral Reactions With Chiral Electrons

    Here’s a weird one for the Strange Things to Do With Chirality file. A multi-center team (Hebrew Univ., Weizmann Inst., Univ. Modena, and Pitt) report that electron spin, of all things, can be a chiral reagent. Some readers will sit up at that phrase, and others will (understandably) wonder what I’m talking about. Perhaps that… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    The Return of Kekulene

    Kekulene! This is one of those molecules that someone who’s learning organic chemistry might sketch out on a whiteboard, wondering if it really exists. It does, but it’s not like we have a lot of recent information about it. There was a preparation of it in 1978 (from the Staab group at the Max-Planck Institute… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Copernicium Is A Strange Element Indeed

    OK, let’s talk about something with pretty much no practical relevance whatsoever: the element copernicium. That’s #112, just below mercury in the periodic table, and its longest-lived isotope has a half-life of 29 seconds. Which is actually pretty impressive – that’s one of the longest-lived elements up there at those atomi… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Lithium Ion Batteries: The 2019 Chemistry Nobel Prize

    I am very pleased to write up a blog post on the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, because it is well overdue. People have been saying that about recognition of the discovery of lithium-ion batteries for many years now, and like many others I’m just glad that the committee was able to recognize John Goodenough… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    A New Way to Make Azides

    I wanted to mention this paper that’s out in Nature, especially since I was mentioning azide/alkyne click chemistry the other day. If you’re using that system in any sort of chemical diversity sense, you’ve run into problems on the azide end. There are not a whole lot of commercially available azides out there (although definitely… Read More
123...