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Posts tagged with "Chemical News"

  • Analytical Chemistry

    The Return of Kekulene

    Kekulene! This is one of those molecules that someone who’s learning organic chemistry might sketch out on a whiteboard, wondering if it really exists. It does, but it’s not like we have a lot of recent information about it. There was a preparation of it in 1978 (from the Staab group at the Max-Planck Institute… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Copernicium Is A Strange Element Indeed

    OK, let’s talk about something with pretty much no practical relevance whatsoever: the element copernicium. That’s #112, just below mercury in the periodic table, and its longest-lived isotope has a half-life of 29 seconds. Which is actually pretty impressive – that’s one of the longest-lived elements up there at those atomi… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Lithium Ion Batteries: The 2019 Chemistry Nobel Prize

    I am very pleased to write up a blog post on the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, because it is well overdue. People have been saying that about recognition of the discovery of lithium-ion batteries for many years now, and like many others I’m just glad that the committee was able to recognize John Goodenough… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    A New Way to Make Azides

    I wanted to mention this paper that’s out in Nature, especially since I was mentioning azide/alkyne click chemistry the other day. If you’re using that system in any sort of chemical diversity sense, you’ve run into problems on the azide end. There are not a whole lot of commercially available azides out there (although definitely… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Automated Discovery

    To what extent can scientific discovery be automated? Where are the areas where automation can make the biggest contribution to human efforts? These questions and a number of others are addressed in a very interesting two-part review article on “Automated Discovery in the Chemical Sciences”. The authors, from MIT, are well-equipped (in… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Hindered Ethers Made Easier

    Since I mentioned a new Mitsunobu-type reaction yesterday, I should note that a new route to hindered ethers has come out this summer from the Baran group at Scripps. Here’s the ChemRxiv version, and here’s the Nature paper that just appeared. And there are more details at the group’s blog here. It’s an electrochemical react… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Meet the New Mitsunobu

    Well, people have been searching for a reaction like this one for quite a while now: that link describes a catalytic Mitsunobu-like reaction, and the original has always been a transformation that synthetic organic chemists groan about but use anyway. It’s a way of substituting an OH group in one pot with what should be… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Trifluoromethyl Amides, Now Available

    Early-stage medicinal chemists are going to be all over this paper that’s just come out in Nature. That’s because it opens up a whole interesting class of molecules that we’ve never really had access to: N-trifluoromethyl amides. That phrase won’t do much for you unless you’re a synthetic organic chemist, and especiall… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Not All Of Those Compounds Are Real. Again.

    The Nrf2 pathway has been a hot area of research for some years now, particularly in oncology. It’s a basic-leucine-zipper transcription factor that under normal conditions stays mostly out in the cytosol, where it’s under tight regulatory control. Under cellular stress, though, it heads into the nucleus and fulfills its transcription-f… Read More
  • Chemical News

    The One Source of Perfect Crystals

    Unless you’re really into graphene (or other two-dimensional advanced materials) you’ve probably never heard of these guys. Takashi Tanaguchi and Kenji Watanabe at Tsukuba’s National Institute of Materials Science are basically the only source in the world for high-quality crystals of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), and that is app… Read More