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Posts tagged with "Clinical Trials"

  • Clinical Trials

    Quietly Another Drug Candidate Disappears

    I wanted to note something today that won’t make many headlines outside of biopharma, but it’s just the sort of story that I wish more people knew about. Let’s start with this: there’s a terrible disease called IPF, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Anyone with any medical background knows to beware the word “idiopathic&# Read More
  • Cancer

    Your Cancer Targets May Not Be Real

    I wrote here about a paper from Cold Spring Harbor labs that invalidated MELK as a cancer target. That was straightforward enough: knocking it out via CRISPR across a whole range of cancer cell lines had no effect on their growth at all, so it’s kind of hard to make the case that it’s an… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Stopping Early

    There was a mention yesterday in the comments section about a clinical trial that was stopped early due to efficacy. I’ve never been involved with a project that this has happened to myself – pretty much the opposite, for the most part! – but it does happen, and is generally cause for celebration. Although not… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    An Awful Idea: Paying to Get Into a Clinical Trial

    This article at Stat by Rebecca Robbins really caught me eye. It describes clinical trials where the participants are being asked to pay thousands of dollars just to join the trial. There seems to have been an increase in this sort of thing lately, and I’ll be completely clear: I think that’s a terrible idea… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Acronym Fever. We Need an Acronym For That.

    The Wall Street Journal published a provocative article the other day, entitled “Don’t Understand Moronic Bromides?” about the proliferation over the years of acronyms in science.(Note the old-fashioned usage of “bromide” derived from the early sleeping pills). And while it’s a cranky piece, it’s not wrong. Read More
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    A Missed Alzheimer’s Opportunity? Not So Much

    The Washington Post made quite a splash with this story about Pfizer, Enbrel (etanercept), and Alzheimer’s disease. There’s already been a lot of comment about it yesterday on Twitter and in some other venues, but I thought it might be useful to try to sum things up in an easily accessible place. Here we go: Read More
  • Cancer

    No Pain, and No Worries?

    The FAAH (fatty acid amide hydrolase) enzyme system has provided a number of headlines over the years. FAAH itself is involved in the brain’s endocannabinoid system – it clears neurotransmitters like anandamide – and a number of other biologically important hydroxyethylamide and acyltaurines. So the potential for inhibitors of it… Read More
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    A Brief Note About Alzheimer’s

    Well, there it is. Biogen and Eisai have announced just this morning that they’re halting Phase III trials of aducanumab, their anti-amyloid antibody, after the monitoring committee judged that further treatment would be futile. I’m not going to do some sort of victory dance, because (once again) this is bad news for Alzheimer’s… Read More
  • Cancer

    An Unexpected Halt in Multiple Myeloma for Venetoclax

      Venetoclax (ABT-199) is an unusual drug. But now there’s some unusually bad (and unexpected) news about it. That’s the structure at right, and medicinal chemists will understand immediately why it’s a bit of an outlier. With a molecular weight of 868, that structure just keeps on going, with a somefeatures that you donR… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Zafgen: Will There Be a Third Act?

    A few years ago on this blog, I wrote several times about a small company called Zafgen and their unusual epoxide-based chemical matter (beloranib) that was in development for the rare Prader-Willi syndrome. That’s a genetic disorder that includes, among many other problems, constant hunger (with the complications that you’d expect fro… Read More
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