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Posts tagged with "Diabetes and Obesity"

  • Business and Markets

    Arena / Lorcaserin Update

    I wrote in March about lorcaserin, Arena Pharmaceutical’s serotonin ligand for obesity. Their clinical data had come out, and things (at least to me) didn’t look good. They didn’t quite make the minimum threshold for efficacy, and the FDA isn’t in a mood to take a flyer on on things that don’t quite work. Well… Read More
  • Aging and Lifespan

    Exercise and Vitamins: Now, Wait A Minute. . .

    Now, this is an example of an idea being followed through to its logical conclusion. Here’s where we start: the good effects of exercise are well known, and seem to be beyond argument. Among these are marked improvements in insulin resistance (the hallmark of type II diabetes) and glucose uptake. In fact, exercise, combined with… Read More
  • Diabetes and Obesity

    A DPP-IV Compound Makes It Through

    After talking the other week about the problems that Takeda has had with their DPP-IV inhibitor for diabetes, it now appears that AstraZeneca and Bristol-Myers Squibb have made it through the same narrows with their own drug. Saxagliptin has met the FDA’s latest guidelines for cardiovascular safety, which (you’d think) will remove the b… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Another Obesity Drug? Not Likely.

    One of the drug targets for obesity that’s been kicking around for years now is a serotonin-receptor based idea, a 5-HT2c agonist. There are several lines of evidence that make this a plausible way to affect appetite – well, as plausible as any of the appetite-based obesity targets are. I’ve long been wary of these… Read More
  • Cardiovascular Disease

    Takeda Gets A Surprise

    DPP-IV is short for “dipeptidylpeptidase IV”, understandably, and we need a good abbreviation for it. It’s an important enzyme target for diabetes therapy, since under normal conditions it breaks down glucagon-like-peptide 1. Longer-circulating GLP-1 would actually do a lot of diabetics good, and people have actually made such proteins as sep… Read More
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    Does Glucophage Make Alzheimer’s Worse?

    Metformin, now there’s a drug story for you. It’s a startlingly small molecule, the sort of thing that chemists look and and say “That’s a real drug?” It kicked around in the literature and the labs in the 1960s, was marketed in Europe in the 1980s but was shopped around in the US for quite… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Avandia: Trouble, Run Head to Head

    Avandia (rosiglitazone) has been under suspicion for the last couple of years, after data appeared suggesting a higher rate of cardiovascular problems with its use. GlaxoSmithKline has been disputing this association all the way, as well they might, but today there’s yet more information to dispute. A retrospective study in the Archives of Intern… Read More
  • Diabetes and Obesity

    CB-1 Obesity Drugs: Farewell to the Whole Lot

    The painful saga of Acomplia (rimonabant) has finally come to an end. Sanofi-Aventis has announced that they’re completely giving up on the drug. There was really no other option – the compound was never approved in the US, and was never going to be, and late in October the EU ordered it to be withdrawn… Read More
  • Biological News

    Fructose In The Brain?

    Let’s talk sugar, and how you know if you’ve eaten enough of it. Just in time for Halloween! This is a field I’ve done drug discovery for in the past, and it’s a tricky business. But some of the signals are being worked out. Blood glucose, as the usual circulating energy source in the body… Read More
  • Diabetes and Obesity

    Taranabant Is No More

    Merck has taken a step that many people have been expecting, and announced that they are no longer developing taranabant, their cannabinoid antagonist (or is it an inverse agonist?) I’d expressed grave doubts about the drug earlier this year, which turned out to be well-founded. That latter post included the line “I don’t see how… Read More
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